All posts by Chris Singh

Sydney Film Festival reveals seven sinister films for their “Freak Me Out” program

Fans of the dark, weird and macabre side of cinema are once again in for a treat as Freak Me Out returns to the 65th annual Sydney Film Festival. As one of the event’s most popular programs, the collection has once again been carefully stitched together with a far-reaching, open-minded sense of curation from guest programmer Richard Kuipers, who has compiled a list of zingy punk rock slashers, Brazilian werewolf dramas, and two of the most buzzed about horror anthologies in years.... Continue Reading

Greg Sestero to attend Sydney premiere of his new film with Tommy Wiseau, Best F(r)iends

Hot off having his book adapted into one of 2017’s best films, Greg Sestero has rocketed into the press cycle for the wider release of Best F(r)iends: Volume One, his new film with The Disaster Artist himself, Tommy Wiseau. The pair, who made myths and legends in 2003 with peerless accidental classic The Room, will reunite in this new Sestero-written drama (note: not a quirky new black comedy) which has Wiseau relenting some control this time as Justin MacGregor takes the directorial reigns. Sound like something worth your time? It sure is, and Sydney’s Hayden Orpheum agrees.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival reveals a diverse and progressive program for its 65th year

As if you would expect anything less, the Sydney Film Festival has once again come through with an exciting, diverse and progressive program for its 65th iteration. Set for 6th to 17th June, the lauded festival is looking to be as immersive and thought-provoking as ever with a program that reaches far beyond the Official Competition and includes everything from the always anticipated Freak Me Out program, to International Documentaries and an expanded virtual-reality program. All in all, the program spans 326 films from 65 countries, including 21 world premieres.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Ghost Stories (UK, 2018) is a refreshing and original horror anthology

With high replay value and some clever pacing, Andy Nyman and Jeremy Dyson have transposed their West End play Ghost Stories to the big screen with a refreshing eye for originality, spinning a grand three-part horror anthology into one thoroughly entertaining and unpredictable film that never stops subtly building towards its tremendous finale. And that’s ultimately where the genius in what Nyman and Dyson’s project lies, building an engaging central narrative that wraps around these individually fascinating and genuinely terrifying ghost stories; it works both as a horror anthology – a rarity these days, but with homage to classics like Dead of Night and Tales from the Crypt – and as a cohesive film.... Continue Reading

Interview: Lester Francois on using interactive VR to explore the work of Australia’s best-known street artist, Rone

Melbourne-based Director Lester Francois and a team of highly creative individuals are putting together an interactive VR docuseries that’ll highlight individuals artists in some very interesting ways. The planned series, titled Kinetic, begins with Rone, the first episode which recently premiered at SXSW in Austin, Texas and showcased an incredibly immersive, interactive VR experience examining the work and context of the famous Melbourne street artist of the same name.... Continue Reading

First Impressions: Netflix’s Rapture examines the power of hip hop with empathy and intimacy

Hip hop, now considered the dominant and most popular style of contemporary music in the world, is one of the most powerful and important forms of art to emerge in the past few decades, and that can be an incredibly hard notion for many to wrap their head around. The fascination with the art and culture has never been more prevalent, and we’re seeing that come across frequently with films (like Straight Outta Compton), TV series (like The Get Down) and documentaries (like The Defiant Ones) all of which can be related to one another due to a strong and powerful focus on context. These three works sketch in the reasons behind the rhymes, tethering hip hop’s music to the wider contexts in which these artists come from in order to make more people understand what is sometimes a very esoteric art form, one that requires a much deeper understanding of the culture to fully appreciate.... Continue Reading

Interview: Jeremy Workman and Matt Green on the making and meaning of The World Before Your Feet

There are very few documentaries out there that can offer the very of-the-now perspective The World Before Your Feet can. The latest film from Jeremy Workman focuses on subject Matt Green and his endlessly interesting, definitely obsessive, and slightly odd “project”. Anyone who follows his blog would already know; Green has taken it upon himself to walk every street in New York City. He has been walking for over 2,000 days now, and somehow Workman has managed to capture just a fraction (though conceptually a huge piece) of this journey over the past few years.... Continue Reading

SXSW Interview: Rapture director Marcus A. Clarke on T.I., G-Eazy and A Boogie wit da Hoodie

Ahead of Netflix and Mass Appeal’s new docuseries examining hip hop through various rappers across generations, we took to the red carpet preview at the recent SXSW Film Festival to speak to some of the cast and crew. Marcus A. Clarke, who serves as director for three of the eight episodes was once such crew member in attendance, giving us insight into the lives and perspectives of the three artists whose stories he helped bring to life, from Atlanta veteran T.I, to Oakland emcee G-Eazy, to rising New York artist A Boogie wit da Hoodie.... Continue Reading