All posts by Chris Singh

TV Review: The Walking Dead Season 7 Episode 16 “The First Day of the Rest of Your Life” ends with a touching tribute

Curious choices defined The Walking Dead’s season 7 finale “The First Day of the Rest of Your Life”, and while it didn’t quite make up for what’s been an average season at best, it featured all the big beats characteristic of a landmark episode mixed in with those small character moments that teetered between nauseating and genuinely touching.... Continue Reading

TV Review: The Walking Dead Season 7 Episode 15 “Something They Need” sets things up nicely for the finale

“Something They Need” wrapped up everything the way you would expect, setting some final pieces in place for the inevitable showdown in next week’s finale. The problem with this is that the absence of anything unexpected, outside of some nice bits of drama over at The Sanctuary, resulted in a clean episode that lacked any sort of dynamism or excitement. I have no doubt that this is largely due to what’s been plaguing this season of The Walking Dead, in that the writers have overindulged in bottle episodes and refused to be more economical with their large cast, which has forced them to speed up certain sequences that need to be longer to at all be believable, like this week’s visit to Oceanside.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Power Rangers (USA, 2017) is an unexpected thrill for the teen superhero genre

To go back and transpose Power Rangers into a blockbuster teen superhero film in this day and age seems like an odd choice. Though the original TV series quickly became a cult hit, time hasn’t been so kind to the franchise, even if it has strangely persisted for over two decades (it’s 24th season is currently airing in the U.S as “Power Rangers Ninja Steel”). Cast changes and inconsistencies muddled what was otherwise a fun but ultimately silly and forgettable take on superhero culture, mostly notable for its attempts at diversity, deliciously tacky music and Godzilla-like boss battles. On the big screen, director Dean Israelite brings a decidedly dark and muscular tone as he crafts an origin story for the colour-coded superheroes and surprisingly succeeds in blending the campy qualities of the TV show with a template obviously built around this era’s saturation of brooding superhero stories.... Continue Reading

TV Review: The Walking Dead Season 7 Episode 14 “The Other Side” hits the right emotional beats

As we near an obvious showdown between Negan and team Rick we continue season 7’s clumsy attempt to atone for a defining sluggish pace and what has been the series’ most inconsistent show of quality since the first half of season 2. Thankfully, like last week’s enjoyable “Bury Me Here”, the show continues in the right direction with “The Other Side”.... Continue Reading

TV Review: The Walking Dead Season 7 Episode 13 “Bury Me Here” puts Morgan in the spotlight

It’s no secret that The Walking Dead is beginning to lose momentum. Seven seasons in and it seems the monolithic survival-horror series keeps tripping over itself more often than not, with inconsistency now a defining trait. Unlike Game of Thrones which takes a vignette approach to it’s larger cast, TWD often features stretched bottle episodes that are overlong and push major characters to the side for weeks. Morgan and Carol have suffered because of this, and even though these are two of the strongest characters on the show, their absence this season has been felt with the lack of quality.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Alone in Berlin (Germany/France/UK, 2016) celebrates silent protest in Nazi Germany

Obedience and groupthink were cogs of a never-ending machine which kept Nazism running in the sinister era of Hitler. Husbands would churn trough factory work in the name of their Fuhrer, housewives would do all they were allowed to in order to support the regime, and their sons would fight and coldly die, scared and alone. This prototype is what frames the protagonists in Vincent Perez’s Alone in Berlin, a true life story adapted from a 1947 Hans Fallada novel which follows a German couple whose discontent with the regime and the sacrifices of war transformed into a small but determined operation aimed at sewing seeds of dissent, subverting the very idea of Hitler. If anything, it’s fun watching Emma Thompson and Brendan Gleeson as they work towards their small but hopeful part in dividing wartime Berlin, slowly but surely throwing sand in the gears of the Nazi war machine.... Continue Reading

Video Games Preview: Dark Souls III expansion ‘The Ringed City’ doesn’t hold back

A recent statement made by FromSoftware president Hedetaka Miyazaki has indicated that Dark Souls III could be the final chapter in the series, so forthcoming DLC The Ringed City could be our last chance to dip into the unforgiving world that has been so thoughtfully spun for hardcore gamers these past few years. Of course we are still going to see Dark Souls-esque games, as early as sometime this year even (please be Bloodbourne 2), but for now The Ringed City has some pretty hefty expectations to live up to, being the apex of the divisive and storied franchise. Obviously that means it has to be as difficult and frustrating as possible, to live up to the Dark Souls name of course.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Rachel Perkins’ adaptation of Jasper Jones (Australia, 2017) finds strength in its cast

We don’t get many films set in small Australian towns in the mid-60s, and though this is the era applied to the story of Jasper Jones, what unfolds is far from exclusive to any one period. Through a cleverly winding and well-paced tale, adapted by director Rachel Perkins from Craig Silvey’s best-selling novel, Jasper Jones reveals an overlapping hotbed of hypocrisy, xenophobia and sexual abuse through the wide-eyed and inquisitive Charlie Bucktin (Levi Miller) and the film’s eponymous character, an indigenous outsider played with a potent mix of strength and fear by Aaron L. McGrath.... Continue Reading

Film Review: T2 Trainspotting (UK, 2017) sees Danny Boyle uses nostalgia to great effect

How T2 Trainspotting juggles change and continuity is quite extraordinary. In a world of disappointing reboots and sequels that don’t quite justify their existence, Danny Boyle’s follow-up to his drug-addled 1996 icon is not only good, it’s damn near perfect, complementing the first without repeating it as we catch up with Renton (Ewan McGregor), Sick Boy (Jonny Lee Miller), Spud (Ewen Bremner) and – yep – Begbie (Robert Carlyle) 20 years after Renton split with the bag full of drug money. For this overdue revisit, Boyle looks to Irvine Welsh’s ill-received Porno but doesn’t quite follow the novel to a tee, instead he and returning screenwriter John Hodge use their very welcome judgement to piece together a story that should go far in satisfying Trainspotting’s enormous cult following.... Continue Reading