All posts by Harris Dang

Film Review: A Ghost Story (USA, 2017)

David Lowery is a filmmaker whose work I have enjoyed due to thenrestrained approach to his direction, his way of humanizing his characters and his sincere, honest approach to storytelling. Whether it be a small-scale story like Ain’t Them Bodies Saints or a commercial film like the recent Pete’s Dragon, his directorial and screenwriting touch is always apparent.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Netflix’s To the Bone (USA, 2017) will create controversy, but succeeds with strong cast and direction

Films containing subject matter of death or disease, particularly the ones that aim for a teenage audience, tend to be sappy (like My Sister’s Keeper), melodramatic and even deeply misguided, if done wrong. I tend to cringe whenever I hear about another film tacking such subject, but in the case of Netflix’s To the Bone (out Friday), I was quite intrigued.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: The Beguiled (USA, 2017) is a worthy remake with an excellent cast and crew

Apart from Lost in Translation and Marie Antoinette, I haven’t seen much of director Sofia Coppola‘s work. Known for her filmmaking approach to humanize her subjects with unorthodox methods like gentle pathos, looking through different character points-of-views outside the norm and the use of anachronisms, Coppola has achieved a reputation of being a director that is both rebellious and restrained.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: Okja (USA/Korea, 2017) delivers an exhilarating, heartfelt ride from a master filmmaker

Okja is a film involving a giant mutated pig. What more do you want? But seriously, in order to understand the hype of the film, you have to know the filmmaker Bong Joon-Ho.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Kung Fu Yoga (China/India, 2017) is a disappointment for Jackie Chan fans

Before I get into this review, let’s get this out of the way. Ever since I first saw one of his films on SBS, I’ve been a huge fan of Jackie Chan, due to his incredible dexterity, creative fight choreography, amazing stuntwork and his likable aw-shucks persona.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: Happy End (France, 2017) plays like a greatest hits album for Haneke

Michael Haneke is a bit of a misanthrope, isn’t he? Granted, I haven’t seen all of his films, but the few that I have seen seem to have a very critical view on society and human nature. And compared to mainstream fare, he makes films with plenty of space for the audience to contemplate and ponder what is happening on-screen with little to no spoon-feeding whatsoever.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: The Forest of Lost Souls (Portugal, 2017) is an eerie and unconventional horror

Out of all the cinematic genres, horror is, in my opinion, the best outlet for creative storytelling. Whether in a metaphorical sense, a symbolic sense, or just nuts-and-bolts mainstream filmmaking, horror can engage, thrill, scare and surprise, regardless of what it looks like on the outside.... Continue Reading

Bong Joon-ho’s OKJA mildly NSFW trailer looks like the mutant super-pig film you never knew you wanted

Who would have thought that one of the most anticipated movies of the year would be a film about a mutant super-pig? Well, this is thanks to the critically acclaimed Korean director, Bong Joon-ho, whose previous films have been critical successes all over the world.... Continue Reading

Film Review: John Wick: Chapter Two (USA, 2017) proves itself a very serviceable sequel

From comedic roles like his iconic slacker character, Ted “Theodore” Logan to the action heroes like Jack Traven from Speed and Neo from The Matrix films; dramatic roles like in River’s Edge and Hardball; and even villainous roles like in The Gift and Man of Tai Chi, Keanu Reeves is far more versatile an actor than he’s often given credit for. You certainly can’t criticise the man for lack of trying.... Continue Reading

Film Review: The Innocents (Poland/France, 2016) is a remarkable, must-see film

Films based on true events are often met with a mixed response; audience left to question the validity of the liberties its filmmakers have taken. Though it can render some films as potentially predictable or even unbelievable, others can be inspiring and heart-wrenching. In the case of The Innocents, we find cinema that belongs to the latter camp; quietly powerful, thanks to a subtle approach to storytelling and assured direction.... Continue Reading