All posts by Jake Tired

Melbourne International Film Festival Review: Namatjira Project (Australia, 2017) continues the story of Australia’s most prolific Aboriginal artist

Albert Namatjira remains one of Australia’s most revered artists. At the time of his death, his collection exceeded two thousand individual paintings, a perceptive catalogue of the landscapes that form the barren heart of Australia’s central regions. Yet his significance far extends his body of work. ... Continue Reading

Melbourne Documentary Film Festival Review: China’s 3 Dreams checks the aftermath of The Cultural Revolution two generations on

It’s been more than forty years since Emperor Mao Zedong passed, yet the events of the Revolution remain a foreign subject to much of China’s youth. Beneath the doctored history, propaganda and piecemeal curriculum, the impact of Mao’s leadership remains present in the generation that survived it.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: Spoor (Poland, 2017) explores the extent of one woman’s compassion

Agnieszka Holland creates a character to love and to loath in Spoor, the Polish thriller-comedy that follows one woman’s passion for animal justice in a town that doesn’t share the same sentiments. Spoor, meaning the tracks left by an animal, is a film that rarely falls from the trail, coming together as a poignant comedy with lead actress Agnieszka Mandat-Grabka at the film’s vanguard.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: Wet Woman in the Wind (Japan, 2016) beckons the return of the Roman Porno

Akihiko Shiota’s Wet Woman in the Wind is a feature-length manhunt, set into motion by Shiori (Yuki Mamiya) riding her bike into the sea. She emerges as she entered, focused and unwavering, locking on to Kosuke (Tasuku Nagaoka), a playwright in pursuit of celibacy. Shiota’s film develops into a playful take on a Japanese sub-genre and introduces Western audiences to the type of film that couldn’t have originated anywhere else.... Continue Reading

Angelo Badalamenti’s soundtrack from the original Twin Peaks continues to dream on

And as the last note from “Love Theme” fades, David Lynch pats Angelo Badalamenti on the back, before leaning closer to whisper, “you are my muse.” Angelo, caressing the hand resting on his back,  returns “and you mine.” The two, now with hands clasped, are shrouded by a ring of light, a light that grows outwards, piercing the room and reaching into the sky before vanishing in a galvanic flash; revealing a composing-directing singularity where two men had previously sat.... Continue Reading

Eight things we’re hoping to see from the return of Twin Peaks

After twenty-six years Twin Peaks breathes once more. The series formerly declared dead by director David Lynch, will return following two and a half decades of speculation and fan civil war (born by the closing scene of the final episode – Beyond Life and Death). Its revival beckons the Lynchian cult to raise their lighters to the sky and ceremoniously burn photos of the 1990’s ABC executives responsible for the show’s cancellation. Or was the hiatus just another part of the narrative? It’s only the first end that we want to see tied when Twin Peaks returns on Monday, exclusively on Stan Australia.... Continue Reading

Gold Coast Film Festival Review: Out Of The Shadows (Australia, 2017) makes promises it cannot fulfil

The opening moments of Out Of The Shadows are among its best. The first scene, a tracking shot through a murder scene with grievously damaged bodies, an upset detective and an unsettling atmosphere set by the colour grade and sound, promises a clever indie horror that for the most part, the film fails to deliver.... Continue Reading

Gold Coast Film Festival Review: The Osiris Child: Science Fiction Volume One (Australia, 2016) is Star Wars on a shoestring

In ninety-five minutes, The Osiris Child recreates the past twenty years of sci-fi. It’s a fast blend of genre styles new and old, reaching screens in the format of a graphic novel and touching bases with every ‘humanity in crisis’ story ever told. While never profound, The Osiris Child achieves its vision, but the lack of storytelling stunts the potential of the Aussie sci-fi flick.... Continue Reading

Gold Coast Film Festival Review: My Entire High School Sinking Into The Sea (USA, 2016) is high school through a kaleidoscope

My Entire High School Sinking Into The Sea is a psychedelic trip through four storeys of a floating high school. About as bad of a place as someone would want to take a transcendental journey, but for the main characters it’s an edifying one, filled with colour, strange visuals and awkward relationships.... Continue Reading