All posts by Natalie Salvo

For Film’s Sake Festival Review: Dust Cloth (Turkey, 2016) is a subtle and well-intentioned character study

Dust Cloth (Toz Bezi) is the sort of film you’d get if you crossed Phil Collins’ “Another Day in Paradise” with Radiohead’s “No Surprises.” It’s the subtle, everyday story that shows the poverty that two working class women in Istanbul endure. While it is a well-observed and well-intentioned tale, this is also a character study that is a bit too meandering and slow for its own benefit.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Below Her Mouth (Canada, 2016) is a steamy lesbian love story

Put in simple terms, Below Her Mouth is a story about a girl meets a girl except that the latter is engaged to a boy. It’s a tender lesbian romance that showcases the sexual awakening of one of its lead characters. But it’s also one that could do with a lot more conversation and a little less action, because these two lovers get very busy to the point that they do very little else.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Things To Come (France/Germany, 2016) is a quiet meditation on middle-age turmoil

Just like starting over. That’s the name of a John Lennon song but it’s also a line that could be used to sum up the French film, Things To Come (L’avenir). The story is a subtle character study about a middle-aged woman and how she negotiates a bunch of set-backs with a kind of understated and inspired dignity.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Festival bound Supergirl (USA, 2016) is an inspiring documentary about achieving the impossible

It’s a bird…it’s a plane…it’s Supergirl! The documentary, Supergirl is a film about an American girl with superhuman strength. It’s an inspirational story that is about kicking down barriers and achieving the impossible in the competitive world/sport that is powerlifting.... Continue Reading

Netflix Review: Casting JonBenet is an ambitious, clever and exploitative, experimental documentary

Casting JonBenet is a film that requires you to know this unsolved murder case but also leave your expectations at the door. In the 20 years that have passed since the murder of the child beauty queen, JonBenet Ramsey there have been all manner of documentary exposés and coverage of this crime. Yet Casting JonBenet comes from a very different place, by employing an experimental and avant-garde style to create a piece of art that straddles the lines between the complex and the thoughtful as well as moments that are exploitative and in poor taste.... Continue Reading

TV Review: Netflix’s Girlboss sees a caustic hustler-turned-throwaway-fashion success story

Girlboss is a series that may leave viewers feeling conflicted. While it’s great to see an underdog making good and pursuing her passion it’s also hard to root for a lead character who is so inherently unlikeable. This Netflix series is ultimately like a fun ball of fairy floss, it’s pleasant enough at first bite; but it’s also a little bit throwaway and lightweight.... Continue Reading

Gold Coast Film Festival Review: Sophie & The Rising Sun (USA, 2017) is an intense story about a powerful & forbidden love

Before there was Loving there was Sophie & The Rising Sun (well, sort of). Sophie & The Rising Sun is a romantic story and like Loving it is one that’s all about a bi-racial couple. The film is ultimately a beautiful but fictional love story where you can really sit back, relax and get lost in it all.... Continue Reading

Film Review: HBO’s The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is a vital bio-pic about the most important woman in medical history

The name Henrietta Lacks may not mean an awful lot to some people but in reality it should be one of the most famous names in history. Lacks is responsible for revolutionising modern medicine and contributing to every recent major medical breakthrough from vaccines for polio, HPV and the flu-shot; to IVF and treatments for cancer and AIDs. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is an excellent bio-pic that gives some long-overdue credit to where it is due.... Continue Reading