All posts by Natalie Salvo

Melbourne International Film Festival Review: Orlando (UK, 1992) is a meandering look at gender studies in history

Blur may have sung about “girls who are boys who like boys to be girls,” but it was writer, Virginia Woolf who got there first. Her short novel, Orlando is about a young, aristocratic man who wakes up one day and discovers he’s become a woman. It was a novel that was written by Woolf for her lover, Vita Sackville-West and later adapted into a 1992 film called Orlando. It sees Tilda Swinton playing the titular character in a fine, androgynous performance but that’s really all there is to it.... Continue Reading

Film Review: The Time Of Their Lives (UK, 2017) is a pleasant road trip & light comedy about two unlikely friends

The Time Of Their Lives is a film about two unlikely friends getting a second chance at life. It’s one where you feel like if it had had its own second chance it could have been excellent, but instead will have to settle for being just good. This is ultimately a light, comedy caper and buddy story about two old biddies letting their hair down on the road.... Continue Reading

Melbourne Film Festival Review: Ask the Sexpert (USA, 2017) is a surprisingly funny, frank & fascinating discussion about sex

You may not be familiar with the name, Dr. Mahinder Watsa but to many people he could be “Dr Love.” This nonagenarian is a former gynaecologist turned sexologist and author of a daily column in the Mumbai Mirror. Ask The Sexpert is an intimate portrait of this charming, progressive and wise old man who will leave people thinking of him as the “Good doctor.”... Continue Reading

Melbourne International Film Festival Review: Something Quite Peculiar (AUS/UK, 2017) is a rich and tantalising portrait about the one and only Steve Kilbey

You get the feeling that the story of The Church has enough in it to fill up several movies. But the documentary, Something Quite Peculiar doesn’t try to be a definitive guide to the band. Instead, it lays its focus squarely on front man, Steve Kilbey and adapts his 2014 memoir of the same name. The result is a fascinating look at one of Australia’s most prolific musicians and possibly our hardest working artist.... Continue Reading

Melbourne International Film Festival Review: Unrest (USA, 2017) is an illuminating documentary about people with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Unrest is a documentary that was difficult to make and a challenging one to watch. The film is the debut feature by journalist, Jennifer Brea who chronicles her life with myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) or chronic fatigue syndrome. She also speaks to others that have this condition by conducting interviews from her bed via Skype. ME is a disease that has been maligned and met with scepticism by the medical establishment because no cause has been discovered. One thing that is clear from this film is that there needs to be more research into this mysterious, debilitating affliction.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Love At First Child (Ange et Gabrielle) (France, 2015) is a pleasantly throwaway rom-com

Love At First Child (Ange et Gabrielle) is a film where a baby brings a man and woman together. And we’re not talking about its parents. This film is a light, French rom-com that is a little like eating a sweet soufflé, it’s fluffy and nice at the time but utterly forgettable shortly afterwards.... Continue Reading

Five things we learned from Chris Gethard’s HBO special Career Suicide

Chris Gethard is an American comedian and talk show host. He has written jokes for an NFL player and completed a writing stint on Saturday Night Live. His HBO special, Career Suicide is presented by the one and only, Judd Apatow and it’s a funny and sobering look at depression, addiction and suicide. We put together the top five things we learned from Career Suicide:... Continue Reading