All posts by Natalie Salvo

Six things we learned revisiting Riding In Cars With Boys (USA, 2002) in its new Blu-Ray release

Riding In Cars With Boys is a bittersweet drama/light comedy about one woman’s teenage pregnancy, married life to a drug addict and some other periods when things did not go according to her grand plan. It’s an adaptation of a memoir by Beverly D’Onofrio that was adapted for the screen by Morgan Ward. It’s also a film that sees Drew Barrymore playing the main character at the ages of 15 to 37 and some other points in between. ... Continue Reading

Melbourne Documentary Film Festival Review: Placebo Alt.Russia (UK, 2016) is a fascinating documentary about Russia’s art & black market music

Placebo have always been a band that proudly sit outside of the mainstream. So it’s not a giant leap for this group of alternative musicians to want to seek out like-minded individuals when they are on tour. Placebo Alt.Russia is partially an arts and political documentary and part travelogue as the band traverse through different cities in Russia (sometimes on the Trans-Siberian Express) to investigate whether the country is as oppressive to its creative minds as the Western press would have us all believe.... Continue Reading

Melbourne Documentary Film Festival Review: The Slippers (Canada, 2016) is unbelievable, whimsical and charming

In the film, The Wizard of Oz Dorothy taps her ruby red slippers and says, “There’s no place like home.” But have you ever wondered where was home for those striking shoes? The documentary, The Slippers is a fascinating film that covers what became of this beloved slice of movie history in a story that is sometimes so strange and bizarre that you couldn’t make this stuff up. It’s a tale that has everything in it from romps through history to thefts, betrayals, conflicting emotions and obsession.... Continue Reading

Melbourne Documentary Film Festival Review: Play Your Gender (Canada, 2016) is an inspiring music documentary that encourages female producers & engineers

Artists like Madonna, Beyoncé, Taylor Swift and Katy Perry are some of the biggest names in the music industry. But in the shadows of these successful women you will see lots of men. When you look behind-the-scenes at the music business it is one big old boys’ club but does it have to be this way? The documentary, Play Your Gender asks why there aren’t more female producers and sound engineers and answers this in a very interesting, well-constructed and engaging way.... Continue Reading

Seven things we learned from Director Sofia Coppola at a special The Beguiled Q & A in Sydney

Writer and director Sofia Coppola recently became the second woman to win the best director award at Cannes. She won the gong for her latest film, The Beguiled, a gothic story about a group of isolated, Southern girls who take in a wounded solider during the American Civil War. It’s a remake of the 1971 drama/thriller but this time around it is told from the female perspective.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: Song to Song (USA, 2017) is a soulless endurance test with no plot or point

A song is as song except when it’s a Terrence Malick film. The famous director’s latest experimental offering is an absolute waste in that it is all show and no substance. It weaves together cameos from famous A-list creatives and a cast of Hollywood’s finest actors and then it does nothing. Absolutely nothing. For 129 minutes. And not even in that funny Seinfeld brand of nothingness, because at least that sitcom was actually something.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: The Young Karl Marx (France, 2017) is a safe bio-pic about the famous philosopher & socialist

The Young Karl Marx (Le jeune Karl Marx) is a bio-pic that feels authentic because it captures the period well in a visual sense. But you also get the feeling that it is only telling a part of the story and not least because it is all about Karl Marx’s youth. This dramatic film is ultimately a nicely-rendered but dry look at the famous revolutionary, which it paints in an overwhelmingly positive light.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: The Go-Betweens: Right Here (Australia, 2017) is a love letter to a seminal Aussie band

The story of The Go-Betweens had previously been largely untold save for Robert Forster’s autobiography, Grant & I. But the film, The Go-Betweens: Right Here is set to change that. It’s a wonderful music documentary that plays out like a love letter to a seminal, Australian band. It also dives head-first into the melodrama, adventure, mirth and madness that typified the group.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: To Stay Alive – A Method (Netherlands, 2016) is a quiet and thoughtful piece with Iggy Pop & Michel Houellebecq

Some people subscribe to the theory that you’ve got to suffer for your art. Two such individuals include the Godfather of Punk, Iggy Pop and the best-selling French novelist, Michel Houellebecq. In To Stay Alive – A Method the pair share a meeting of minds in a film that is artistic, experimental and semi-autobiographical and it’s one that will make you think twice about the idea of the starving artist.... Continue Reading