All posts by Natalie Salvo

Film Review: Finding Your Feet (UK, 2018) is a rom-com about swimming through life’s second act

If ever there was a film that did what it said on the tin then it is Finding Your Feet. This boomer rom-com and English dramedy is all about second chances and discovering your true self. The film is a pleasant and predictable one that should appeal to fans of Hampstead and The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel franchise.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Sweet Country (Australia, 2018) is Australia’s answer to To Kill A Mockingbird

Man on the run. Sweet Country is based on the true, Australian story about a point in history where justice was put on trial. For this reason, it has echoes of To Kill A Mockingbird except that here, Atticus Finch isn’t a lawyer but a preacher played by Sam Neill. The result is a shockingly brutal and important film.... Continue Reading

Film Review: The Post (USA, 2017) is a thrilling look at a significant point in history

These days the words, “The Post” are more likely to get you thinking about a blog then a newspaper. In fact, Steven Spielberg’s latest film, The Post is all about history and a bygone era in print journalism. It’s a historic thriller and bio-pic that looks at how The Washington Post handled the decision to cover the Pentagon Papers. The result is a tense and mostly rewarding story that seems more relevant than ever in this era of President Trump and the proliferation of online fake news.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Darkest Hour (UK, 2017) is a celebration of Churchill’s war of words

Winston Churchill was a leading writer and orator. So it should come as no surprise that Darkest Hour, a new biopic about the British leader sees the usual guns and weaponry synonymous with wartime films replaced with words, glorious words. While the story is not the most necessary one (as it has been told countless times before from varying perspectives) this is still a handsome and convincing portrait of a formidable Prime Minister and his involvement in a pivotal point in history.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Just To Be Sure (Ôtez-moi d’un doute) (France, 2017) is a fun & whimsical little farce

Just To Be Sure (Ôtez-moi d’un doute) is a French comedy that doesn’t take itself too seriously. It deals with some important and weighty issues like: family, identity and roots but handles these in a quirky and funny way. What could have been a self-proclaimed neo-Greek tragedy actually turns out to be a fun and whimsical little farce.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Wonder Wheel (USA, 2017) sees Woody Allen & cast over promise and under deliver

On paper, Wonder Wheel seems to have all of the right credentials. It’s a dramatic film set in the 1950s so it’s bound to look great. It stars Kate Winslet and is directed by Woody Allen. It is also set at the Coney Island Amusement Park. But even with all of this stuff on offer, one would expect Wonder Wheel to be I dunno, more amusing.... Continue Reading

AMW Film Fest Review: Take Me To The River (USA, 2015) is a soaring celebration of blues, rap and soul music

If American music has a heart and soul then you would find it nestled between Memphis and the Mississippi Delta. The documentary film, Take Me To The River realises this and pays homage to the soul men and women that created those passionate and influential hits for the likes of Stax Records and their ilk. This film is an absolute joy that shows the passing of the baton between some legendary and contemporary artists who work together to make beautiful music.... Continue Reading

AMW Film Festival Review: Breaking The Mould (Australia, 2017) is a compelling documentary about Australia’s female musicians

If there was Australia’s answer to the film, Play Your Gender, then Breaking The Mould is it. This music documentary includes interviews with Australian artists about their thoughts and experiences with gender in the local industry. The film is an interesting one about our history and it is something that should help shape the conversation around what should happen next.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Three Summers (Australia, 2017) is an amiable comedy about diversity

Three Summers is a film that is as light and breezy as its title suggests. It’s also an ensemble comedy that is written and directed by the legendary, Ben Elton. The latter is known for his novels and the TV shows: The Young Ones and Blackadder. In Three Summers he creates a warm-hearted and well-intentioned story about Australian race relations. The message is that we should all embrace diversity and listen to each other’s stories. While it’s excellent to see a film about Australia actually reflect the people from this wonderful land of Oz, it’s a damn pity that the plot is so lacking.... Continue Reading