All posts by Natalie Salvo

Film Review: Cameraperson (USA, 2016) is an artistic look at the world of documentary filmmaking & cinematography

Cameraperson shines a light on the individual behind the camera. In this case it is cinematographer, Kirsten Johnson, a woman with some 25 years’ experience in the movie-making business. She’s also known for having worked on films like Fahrenheit 9/11 and Citizenfour, among others. Cameraperson is a documentary that lets the footage speak for itself with varying degrees of success and at its best is an illuminating look at the world of documentary filmmaking.... Continue Reading

Ten things we learnt from the E-Team Sydney screening and Q & A

Sydney recently played host to a screening of the film, E-Team, a documentary about Human Rights Watch’s Emergency Team, a group of fearless individuals that visit the front lines in order to document atrocities that are occurring. There was also a Q & A after the film with Elaine Pearson, the Australian director of Human Rights Watch and Brian Thomson, the international editor of SBS World News. Here are ten things The AU Review learnt from this event.... Continue Reading

Interview: Australian director of Human Rights Watch, Elaine Pearson talks E-team and atrocities taking place in Syria & Libya

Organisations like Human Rights Watch are essential, as they help expose atrocities taking place in war-torn countries. The organisation regularly runs a Human Rights Film festival and they are also supporting a screening of a documentary film called E-Team, a look at what has been happening in Syria and Libya. It was also the recipient of the cinematography award at Sundance in 2014.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Winter at Westbeth (Australia, 2016) is a love letter to the power of creativity & pursuing your passion.

Winter at Westbeth is a film that’s all about “the art.” And celebrating it at every age. This documentary looks at three young at heart, elderly, American artists who live in a vibrant, housing complex called Westbeth Artists Housing in New York. It is ultimately a film that is like a love letter to the power of creativity and pursuing your passion.... Continue Reading

Australian director Rohan Spong on his latest feature documentary Winter at Westbeth

Following its celebrated run at the Melbourne International Film Festival, the new Australian feature documentary Winter at Westbeth will screen in select cinemas around the country from next week. In anticipation of the release, we caught up with the film’s director Rohan Spong to talk about the project, which was filmed across one extraordinary year in New York City’s Westbeth Artists Housing.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Natalie Portman delivers a searing, Oscar-worthy performance in Jackie (USA, 2016)

Jacqueline Kennedy (Onassis) has been depicted on the silver and small screens before but Jackie is the first film to really capture the complex nature of this remarkable woman. The film is not strictly a biopic in that it only focuses on a number of key events in Kennedy’s life prior to and in the aftermath of her husband’s assassination in 1963. But what this drama does do well is hone in on these important points to create an intense and visceral film that really gets at the heart and nature of this tragedy.... Continue Reading

DVD Review: Take Down (USA/UK, 2016) is a contrived thriller that tries too hard to be Brat Camp meets Hunger Games

Take Down (aka Billionaire Ransom) is what you would get if you made cardboard cut-outs characters and put them in a world that was like Brat Camp-meets-The Hunger Games. The film is a thriller that is short on character development and suspense. It means that what ensues feels rather slow, tedious and contrived.... Continue Reading

DVD Review: Rosehaven Series One (Australia, 2016) is a funny comedy misadventure about two unlikely friends

Rosehaven is a comedy show that finds the funny in lots of things. It’s a fish-out-of-water comedy, a buddy comedy and a sitcom set in rural Australia. This eight-part series debuted on the ABC in 2016 and it was a hit with audiences. This is because it’s a funny show about two rather unlikely friends and their lives in the fictional town of Rosehaven.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Miss Saigon translates well to the screen in its 25th Anniversary & will leave you misty-eyed

Miss Saigon has been a regular favourite among theatregoers and in the 25th anniversary film showing the 2014 West End production it’s easy to see why. The musical is a high-stakes love story set in and after the Vietnam War. It also boasts an excellent score that captures the full gamut of emotions and fragility and it translates well to the silver screen.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Woody Allen’s latest Café Society (USA, 2016) offers a nostalgic but throwaway look at the great depression

Woody Allen’s latest film should be renamed “High Society.” This beautifully-shot comedy is a nostalgic but throwaway look at the glitz and glamour of some halcyon days in Hollywood and the smoky nightlife of New York. It’s ultimately like a pleasant and lightweight dream that celebrates money even though the thirties was synonymous for some with the great depression.... Continue Reading