All posts by Natalie Salvo

Sydney Film Festival Review: Yellow Is Forbidden (China/NZ, 2017) is an intimate slice of fashion gold

Colours have different meanings. In Imperial China, yellow was reserved for the emperor. It was believed to be the centre of everything because it generated yin and yang. For fashion designer, Guo Pei it is a colour that has become a signature part of her colour palate. If you don’t believe us, you need look no further than Rihanna’s 2015 Met Gala dress that broke the internet. Yellow Is Forbidden is a fly-on-the-wall documentary that goes behind the seams to examine this fascinating artist and fashion designer.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: McQueen (UK, 2018) is a heart-breaking work of staggering genius

Fashion designer (Lee) Alexander McQueen was a true artist. He would say, “If you want to know me, look at my work.” The documentary, McQueen captures some of his enigma by looking behind-the-scenes at his extraordinary talent and story. While you get some sense of what this artistic genius was like you also get the feeling that some things will be unknowable.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: Bad Reputation (USA, 2017) is one badass party with a rebellious Joan Jett

Joan Jett’s documentary, Bad Reputation had me from the moment she was told girls can’t play rock and roll music and she went ahead and did it anyway. The leather clad rocker has had a brilliant career, which this film celebrates. Bad Reputation is ultimately a fun and rollicking watch about a strong woman who is proud to be utterly true to herself.... Continue Reading

Netflix’s new true crime series The Staircase: Five things you should know

The Staircase is a new true crime series streaming on Netflix. It will appeal to fans of Making A Murderer and The Jinx. A total of 13 episodes were released at different times and span the 16 years covering the trial of Michael Peterson, a man accused of killing his wife Kathleen on 9 December 2001 after her body was found in a pool of blood at the bottom of the stairs. The Iris’s Natalie Salvo has put together the top five things you should know about this program.... Continue Reading

Five Things We Learned From Hannah Gadsby’s Netflix Special Nanette

The best kind of comedy is the one that makes you laugh and cry. It’s the stuff that’s funny but also makes you stop and think. This is precisely the environment that Tasmanian-born comic, Hannah Gadsby’s final swansong, Nanette occupies. This award-winning show was filmed at the Sydney Opera House in 2018 and will premiere on Netflix this month. The Iris’s Natalie Salvo has put together the top five things she learned.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: The Wife (Sweden/UK, 2017) is a slow-burning & tense character study about a woman’s conflicting emotions

The title of the film, The Wife, gives away about as much as the titular character. Is she a good one? A bad lady? The answer is a mystery for a large portion of this slow-burning character study. One thing’s for certain, this wifey is brimming with conflicting emotions in this bittersweet, character-driven drama.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: Westwood: Punk, Icon, Activist (UK, 2018) is about a style iconoclast & punk who became one fine dame

Westwood: Punk, Icon, Activist shares some things in common with David Bowie’s song, “Fashion” and not just for the obvious fact that Vivienne Westwood is a fashion designer. Consider Bowie’s “Listen to me- don’t listen to me/Talk to me- don’t talk to me/Dance with me- don’t dance with me, no” lyrics. It’s a curious dance straddling the lines between do you/don’t you want to and it’s in this same environment that Westwood operates here. She allowed cameras to follow her around but then she’s gone and publicly denounced the final documentary. In the opening scenes she is exasperated and assumes that looking at the past is “boring.” Westwood is quite possibly the world’s most reluctant interviewee even though she speaks well and has strong principles and opinions and it’s this dichotomy that makes this film such an entertaining one.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: Nico, 1988 (Italy, 2017) shows the songstress left behind after all tomorrow’s parties

A bio-pic can be a tricky beast. When a person has achieved so much in their lifetime what part of the story do you focus on? If you’re Italian director, Susanna Nicchiarelli you eschew the obvious and omit the lauded days. Nicchiarelli instead focuses on later life and this is precisely the scene we are greeted with in Nico, 1988.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: Chef Flynn (USA, 2018) is as neat & tidy as an entrée but you will probably be left wanting more

It’s fair to say that most of us home cooks are more like Nailed It! contestants than MasterChefs. So imagine how surprising it is to see a young child cooking up fine dining dishes with aplomb. Chef Flynn is a documentary about Flynn McGarry, this particular child prodigy. While it’s an entertaining story you can’t help but feel like you’re being served an entrée rather than the full three course menu.... Continue Reading