Category Archives: Festivals

AMW Film Fest Review: Take Me To The River (USA, 2015) is a soaring celebration of blues, rap and soul music

If American music has a heart and soul then you would find it nestled between Memphis and the Mississippi Delta. The documentary film, Take Me To The River realises this and pays homage to the soul men and women that created those passionate and influential hits for the likes of Stax Records and their ilk. This film is an absolute joy that shows the passing of the baton between some legendary and contemporary artists who work together to make beautiful music.... Continue Reading

Interview: An American In Texas director Anthony Pedone on the value of community filmmaking

When Anthony Pedone took that twenty-hour flight from Texas to Sydney, he wasn’t making a galvanic trip to Australia’s east coast. He’d spent the past decade salvaging his life from a heinous past, with filmmaking becoming primary in his reformation. After producing more than twenty films and directing and writing three, Anthony was invited to premiere at a festival he’d been seeking to enter for years, the Byron Bay Film Festival. We took this chance to catch up with Anthony and try to understand a little more about his latest work An American In Texas... Continue Reading

Byron Bay Film Festival Film Review: An American In Texas (USA, 2017) is a film for the disenfranchised

It’s a hard fought ninety-seven minutes for the protagonists in An American in Texas, but it’s a fight they could never really win. In Anthony Pedone’s latest, it’s the early 90’s and the U.S has its sights set on a war in the Middle East. As the effects of the conflict settle across the States, we meet a group of friends looking for their way out of small town Texas.... Continue Reading

Interview: Anthony Pedone on An American In Texas and spending his formative years as a foreigner in his own country

When Anthony Pedone took that twenty-hour flight from Texas to Sydney, he wasn’t making a galvanic trip to Australia’s east coast. He’d spent the past decade salvaging his life from a heinous past, with filmmaking becoming primary in his reformation. After producing more than twenty films and directing and writing three, Anthony was invited to premiere at a festival he’d been seeking to enter for years, the Byron Bay Film Festival. We took this chance to catch up with Anthony and try to understand a little more about his latest work An American In Texas.... Continue Reading

Greek Film Festival Review: Mythopathy (Notias) (Greece, 2016) is a coming-of-age story that should appeal to Greek audiences

Mythopathy (Notias) is a film about a boy. Except he’s not just any old kid. This child is one that experiences heartbreak in a novel way. When it happens, he looks towards ancient Greek mythology and stories and he changes aspects of these to suit his own narrative. This coming-of-age story is emotional and imaginative at times but it’s also a little forgettable and difficult to understand at others.... Continue Reading

Cunard British Film Festival Review: That Good Night (UK, 2017) is a dull adaption of a stage play that grapples with morality

That Good Night is a film that could be been called “The Last Night.” This is because it’s a drama about second chances and forgiveness. This handsome film is the last one that the late Sir John Hurt acted in and while it has some intriguing moments, it ultimately suffers from being a play that has been stretched out in order to be adapted for the big screen.... Continue Reading

Cunard British Film Festival Review: Breathe (UK, 2017) is a love letter from one Cavendish to another

Breathe is a love letter from producer, Jonathan Cavendish to his inspiring parents. The film is a bio-pic that chronicles the enduring love that this couple shared for each other as well as their refusal to give up in the face of a devastating disease. This story is an important one that is a testament to the power of human strength; but there are also some moments where you feel like things are being played a little safe.... Continue Reading

Greek Film Festival Review: Amerika Square (Greece, 2016) scales the political polarity in Greece to a single housing block

Until the day when Pixel Buds are so finessed that we no longer need those streaming lines of text, subtitles will be (for most of us) our one entry to foreign films. It’s rare though for subtitles to impact the film in any other way, but in Yannis Sakaridis’s Amerika Square, those flashing words do far more than translate.... Continue Reading