Category Archives: Films

SXSW: Todrick Hall and Director Katherine Fairfax Wright talk Behind The Curtain, deadlines and Hall’s Australian tour

One of the highlights among the many premieres at SXSW this month was the documentary Behind The Curtain: Todrick Hall, which took us on a behind-the-scenes journey of the creation of Hall’s record Straight Outta Oz, its music videos and a subsequent tour – all put together in an impressively short amount of time. While at the festival I sat down with the film’s director Katherine Fairfax Wright and Todrick Hall himself, who will be heading down to Australia with the show in June. We talk about the pair’s crazy workload, working to deadlines, assembling a team and reflect on some of the film’s themes.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Beauty And The Beast (USA, 2017) has breathtaking moments of grandiose cinematic bliss

A story that originated in 1740 now considered one of the most beloved and beautiful of fairytales that has been remade/rebooted/retold a countless number of times, Beauty And The Beast is considered a tale as old as time. Of late Disney has been having a bit of a renaissance if you will, remaking number of their classics into “live action” (with a little help from CGI) films, from Maleficent, Cinderella, The Jungle Book to Pete’s Dragon. Their latest release endeavours to reach young new audiences as well as reviving the old with a hint of nostalgia. ... Continue Reading

Australian Box Office Report: Kong: Skull Island proves king of the box office over Marvel for another week

It appears there’s no stopping the mighty King Kong, as Kong: Skull Island topped the box office for the second week in a row, earning $3.13m. The number of screens this film is available (nationally) has dropped from 523 last week to 395 this week, so we might see this one slip a little after the coming weekend.... Continue Reading

SXSW: Josh Lawson, Director Josh Greenbaum and Australia’s own 007 George Lazenby talk Becoming Bond

Hot on the heels of winning the SXSW Audience Award for the “Visions” programming, we sat down with Aussie actor Josh Lawson, Director Josh Greenbaum and Australia’s own 007 George Lazenby to talk about the film Becoming Bond, which premiered at the festival last week. This pseudo-documentary tells the story of Lazenby, the only Australian to play 007, and the only 007 to appear in but one film – in fact, it was the only cinematic role that Lazenby would ever play. The story, told from Lazenby’s perspective and in his own words, is re-enacted to outstanding effect (in the style of Drunk History) by Lawson.... Continue Reading

Josh Gad on playing LeFou with a conscience, Beauty And The Beast and musical theatre (EXCLUSIVE)

It’s not often that a TV star gets to bounce from the small screen to the Broadway theatre stage and then leap from there over to the silver screen, but so has been the career of Josh Gad. From stints on New Girl and Gigi: Almost American on television. To then landing a part in the Tony award winning musical The Book Of Mormon. Followed by starring as the lovable snowman Olaf in Disney’s hugely successful animated feature Frozen.... Continue Reading

SXSW Film Review: Long Strange Trip (USA, 2017) celebrates the magic, myth and madness that is The Grateful Dead

Long Strange Trip is a documentary about the Grateful Dead that feels just like being at one of the band’s concerts. It is a sprawling, swirling psychedelic affair that lives up to its name as it celebrates a band that has notched up over 50 years in the music business as the reigning kings of the counter-culture movement. This documentary occasionally feels like a hagiography but it’s a fun and justified one because it’s ultimately a free-spirited love letter to one crazy, joyful psychedelic band.... Continue Reading

SXSW Film Review: California Dreams (USA, 2017) should be called “California Delusions”

With La La Land having recently dominated the Oscars, its story about 2 hopefuls trying to make it in Hollywood uncomfortably lingered in the back of my mind while watching California Dreams. Both La La Land and California Dreams share a similar premise of “dreams are built on sacrifice”, however the films attack their subject matter of struggling actors in entirely different ways. While La La Land shimmers with the temptation of nostalgia, love and the greediness of having your cake and eating it too, California Dreams explores sacrifice when you can’t even afford the ingredients to make that proverbial cake.... Continue Reading

AF French Film Festival Review: Monsieur Chocolat (France, 2016) is an emotional ride that leaves you in deep contemplation

Breathtaking and magical, Monsieur Chocolat (directed by Roschdy Zem) is one to watch if you want to experience a Parisian night. Immerse yourself in the world of 19th-century French circus and follow the biopic story of Chocolat (Omar Sy). He journeys from a performer acting as the “cannibal” to a more respected position as a clown in a duo with Foottit (James Thiérrée). Together, they reach fame but things start to fall apart when Chocolat wishes to be more and ambitions clash.... Continue Reading

Film Review: The Eagle Huntress (G) (UK/MONG/USA, 2016) follows an inspiring subject

I have to admit, I don’t watch a lot of documentaries, but I’ve loved the ones I’ve seen. Some of them haven’t felt like documentaries at all, mainly because the stories behind them are a little too one-sided or hard to believe. Films like Super Size Me and Bowling for Columbine have been accused of being false, manipulative as well as misleading. I start off with this because the documentary, The Eagle Huntress, which is released in select cinemas this week, has been accused of being staged, scripted and even acted. But even factoring all of this, does that clench the final verdict that the documentary is a bad viewing experience? In this case, yes and no.... Continue Reading

SXSW Film Review: The Honor Farm (USA, 2017) struggles with its narrative

Horror films aren’t like they used to be. Gone are the days of chainsaw wielding psychos with mummy issues and hockey mask wearing killers…. with mummy issues (I’ve stumbled upon something here). Indeed, the genre has become less about horny teenagers getting gutted in creative ways and more about utilising tropes to symbolise prevalent issues like coming-of-age. ... Continue Reading