Category Archives: Films

Film Review: Justice League (USA, 2017) is a fun yet inconsistent ride that breezes by on the charm of its cast

It’s been something of an arduous trek but the Justice League have finally made their way to the big screen.  Long before Joss Whedon earned the tick of approval from comic enthusiasts the world over with his take on The Avengers, George Miller (Mad Max, Happy Feet) was planning on brining the titular crew to cineplexes in an ambitious actioner where the likes of Armie Hammer and Megan Gale were to play Batman and Wonder Woman, respectively.  The 2007-2008 Writers Strike and multiple delays regarding shooting locations ultimately led to the film’s demise, and DC threw their weight behind the remainder of Christopher Nolan‘s Dark Knight trilogy, leaving the proposed Justice League little more than a pipe dream.... Continue Reading

Win an Atomic Blonde prize pack including signed copy of the graphic novel

Oscar-winner Charlize Theron stars as MI6’s most lethal assassin and the crown jewel of her Majesty’s secret intelligence service, Lorraine Broughton, in Atomic Blonde. When she’s sent on a covert mission into Cold War Berlin, she must use all the spy craft, sensuality and savagery she has to stay alive in a city simmering with revolution and double-crossing traitors.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Borg vs McEnroe (Sweden, 2017) is an uneven film that never feels complete

Borg vs McEnroe feels like a film more tailored for the streaming services market.  A minor feature that’s likely to only really be of interest to tennis fanatics, and even then they might prefer a more traditional documentary, Janus Metz Pedersen‘s drama never feels like a complete production, despite its substantial focus on Bjorn Borg (Sverrir Gudnason) and his intensely monitored childhood.... Continue Reading

Australian Box Office Report: Murder on the Orient Express arrives in 1st place

This week’s box office charts saw a strong opening weekend for Murder On The Orient Express, which went straight to no. 1, earning $3.85m.  This Kenneth Branagh-directed adaptation of the the Agatha Christie mystery classic premiered on 333 screens nationally, and managed an impressive screen average of $11,565.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Blade of the Immortal (Japan, 2017) shows that excess and overkill are good things

Takashi Miike, back in the V-cinema (straight-to-video) era, was a complete madman. Not in a human state (or maybe he is, who the hell knows?), but in his creative state, as the images and ideas he comes up with can only come from a man who is completely bonkers.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Lucky (USA, 2017) is an affecting swan song for the late Harry Dean Stanton

Very few actors have been afforded a send-off as fitting as Harry Dean Stanton has in Lucky.  Throughout his 6 decades of working across both film and television, Lucky, next to his most substantial screen-time turn in 1984’s road movie Paris, Texas, stands as a true showcase for the actor; regardless of the film arriving after his death, it would still be deemed a milestone in his career.... Continue Reading

Writing Music for the Big Screen: Jed Kurzel on life as a Screen Composer

When it comes to music it seems Australian artist Jed Kurzel can do no wrong. Before shifting his focus to films, Kurzel first came to prominence as a founding member of Australian band The Mess Hall. Together with band mate Cec Condon, the blues-rock duo saw success around Australia winning a number of ARIA Awards.  Now, with a growing list of feature film scores to add to his resume and having won awards for his work on Slow West and Snowtown, Kurzel has established himself as an acclaimed film composer.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Kathryn Bigelow doesn’t hold back in Detroit (USA, 2017)

Kathryn Bigelow has already proven a competent and imaginative voice when tackling tough, complex subjects featuring the kind of gutsy brutality that doesn’t need excessive gore or sci-fi elements. She’s much more concerned with real-world situations, exploring human nature as a function of and reaction to extreme pressure; in some ways, it’s similar to the approach Peter Berg has taken with his last three films; although Berg seems to fall short when it comes to character. The Hurt Locker and Zero Dark Thirty were both great, thought-provoking films, both of which made enough of an impact to position Bigelow as one of the most anticipated directors of the past decade, for both film buffs and people who usually don’t give much thought to the director of a film.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Murder On The Orient Express (USA, 2017) beautifully captures the essence of Agatha Christie’s material

With its classic style, striking ensemble, and lack of action-heavy set pieces, Murder on the Orient Express may be a little too refined for modern audiences versed in the ways of today’s distraction-centric filmmaking where bigger and louder equals better.... Continue Reading