Category Archives: Reviews

Film Review: Pirates Of The Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales (USA, 2017) flies with half sails

In the fifth installment of the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise, Dead Men Tell No Tales, we return to the seas on another adventure with our ridiculous Captain Jack Sparrow. This time pairing up with a new bickering couple of non-pirates, and being chased down by his old frenemy Captain Barbossa and his even older enemy Captain Salazar. It’s obvious that none of these sequels will ever match the brilliance of the first film The Curse Of The Black Pearl, but this one sits somewhere similar to second or third films and is thankfully better than its direct predecessor.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Handsome Devil (Ireland, 2016) is a pleasant but predictable coming of age story

Handsome Devil is cut from the same cloth as Sing Street and Dead Poet’s Society, but it also leaves a few things deliberately ambiguous. This is a pleasant, coming-of-age tale set in a private, all-boys boarding school in Ireland. The story ends on an encouraging and positive note where you should be yourself because it reminds us that “No one else can be you”.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Norman: The Moderate Rise & Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer (USA, 2017) is like a conga dance, blurring the lines between friendships & manipulation

Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer is a light comedy film about a human of New York. But he’s not just any human. The eponymous Norman is a wheeler/dealer and the undisputed king of networking. The film is what you’d get if The Ides of March were directed by Woody Allen because it’s a complex, Jewish political story where not all is as it seems.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Netflix’s War Machine (MA15+) (USA, 2017) is an enjoyable satirical war drama in the vein of The Big Short

With the release 2015’s Beasts of No Nation, the streaming giant Netflix began producing their own Netflix Original movies and to this day their library of original content starring high profile actors and actresses continues to grow. Now we see the release of Netflix’s biggest original movie to date, War Machine. Written and directed by David Michôd (Animal Kingdom), War Machine is a satirical war drama that acts as a fictionalised adaptation of the non-fiction book The Operators written by journalist Michael Hastings in 2012.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Neruda (Chile, 2016) is a complex bio-pic that leaves you questioning what is truth and fantasy

Neruda is a film that truly embodies its subject matter. But this proves to be one double-edged sword because it is also to its betterment and detriment. This bio-pic about the eponymous, beloved Chilean poet uses the lyrical qualities the writer employed to bend the narrative in so many ways that the result is virtually imperceptible.... Continue Reading

Film Review: King Arthur: Legend Of The Sword (USA, 2017) is a fun but overcooked take on the myth

Just when you think you’ve seen and heard every iteration of the legend of King Arthur and Excalibur, comes a new take and telling of the myth, one that prefers its heroes dirty, its villains seething and its action ridiculously over the top. There are elements in King Arthur: Legend Of The Sword that really work, and others that seem overcooked and somewhere sitting in the middle is a film that had the potential to do something really unique and fun but doesn’t quite hit all the marks.... Continue Reading

Video Game Review: The Surge (PS4, 2017) will be familiar to Souls fans but has a few tricks of its own

The Surge is a game that we’ve seen before. But despite taking combat elements from games like Dark Souls and Bloodborne, in addition to their world-building and narrative tropes, The Surge  finds room to stand on its own, paving the way for an action-RPG experience that is mostly successful. Continue reading Video Game Review: The Surge (PS4, 2017) will be familiar to Souls fans but has a few tricks of its own

Film Review: John Wick: Chapter Two (USA, 2017) proves itself a very serviceable sequel

From comedic roles like his iconic slacker character, Ted “Theodore” Logan to the action heroes like Jack Traven from Speed and Neo from The Matrix films; dramatic roles like in River’s Edge and Hardball; and even villainous roles like in The Gift and Man of Tai Chi, Keanu Reeves is far more versatile an actor than he’s often given credit for. You certainly can’t criticise the man for lack of trying.... Continue Reading