Category Archives: Reviews

Video Game Review: For Honor hacks and slashes its way to victory

From the beginning, it is immediately apparent that For Honor is a special game. Games of this caliber that not only present intricate and diverse mechanics that allow for fluid moment-to-moment gameplay, but remain addictive and fulfilling at the same time, expecting players to tackle its mechanics with both persistence and patience.  For Honor puts players in the shoes of 3 different factions; The Knights, The Vikings and The Samurai. Players will use these various classes and characters in both single player and multiplayer modes to wage a persistent and evolving online war. Throughout both these modes, it is evident that this is one of the most technically complete combat systems in years. Continue reading Video Game Review: For Honor hacks and slashes its way to victory

Film Review: Fist Fight (USA, 2017) has solid storytelling, but otherwise falters

If there’s one thing everybody can say about this film, it is that the film is punchy. Studio comedies have been very underwhelming the past few years, especially from studios like Warner Brothers (the less said about Hot Pursuit, the better), regardless of the comedic talent involved.... Continue Reading

Film Review: T2 Trainspotting (UK, 2017) sees Danny Boyle uses nostalgia to great effect

How T2 Trainspotting juggles change and continuity is quite extraordinary. In a world of disappointing reboots and sequels that don’t quite justify their existence, Danny Boyle’s follow-up to his drug-addled 1996 icon is not only good, it’s damn near perfect, complementing the first without repeating it as we catch up with Renton (Ewan McGregor), Sick Boy (Jonny Lee Miller), Spud (Ewen Bremner) and – yep – Begbie (Robert Carlyle) 20 years after Renton split with the bag full of drug money. For this overdue revisit, Boyle looks to Irvine Welsh’s ill-received Porno but doesn’t quite follow the novel to a tee, instead he and returning screenwriter John Hodge use their very welcome judgement to piece together a story that should go far in satisfying Trainspotting’s enormous cult following.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Cameraperson (USA, 2016) is an artistic look at the world of documentary filmmaking & cinematography

Cameraperson shines a light on the individual behind the camera. In this case it is cinematographer, Kirsten Johnson, a woman with some 25 years’ experience in the movie-making business. She’s also known for having worked on films like Fahrenheit 9/11 and Citizenfour, among others. Cameraperson is a documentary that lets the footage speak for itself with varying degrees of success and at its best is an illuminating look at the world of documentary filmmaking.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Silence (MA15+) (USA/JAP/TWN, 2016) not one of Scorsese’s best, but an illuminating experience

If there’s one filmmaker who, in my opinion, hasn’t made a bad film, that filmmaker would be Martin Scorsese. Venturing from genre to genre with ease (who else can go from the family fantasy Hugo to the dark comedy The Wolf of Wall Street just like that?) and always applying professional care and passion within his projects, Scorsese is a filmmaker whose work I will definitely watch, no matter its subject matter.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Hidden Figures (USA, 2016) dismantles segregation piece by piece

The ills of racial segregation have been well-documented in modern cinema; many pieces set in eras like the 60’s have tackled the absurdity and nonsensical way the division functioned in – mostly American – society even when black populations worked side by side with white populations. This is the core tension of Hidden Figures, the ingrained threat of which suppresses three black women who work at NASA despite what would go on to be crucial contributions to a much larger picture – and by larger picture I don’t just mean the well-known launch of the Friendship 7 mission of 1962 in which John Glenn became the first American astronaut to orbit the Earth.... Continue Reading

Blu-Ray review: Morgan (MA15+) (USA, 2016) is well-intentioned, though not entirely successful

A well-intentioned, though not entirely successful debut venture from Luke Scott (son of Alien director Ridley Scott, for those of you playing along at home) Morgan is more a shallow version of Ex-Machina than the slick sci-fi character study it so clearly desires to be.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Fifty Shades Darker (MA15+) (USA, 2017) is a better film, but does it go anywhere?

“Are you just going to stand there and stare Christian Grey”? Anastasia Steele asks a tall well-dressed Christian Grey. “Yes”, he replies. Cue another sensually slow, but saucy scene where the two embrace and then another few roughly edited scenes later, we’re back at Steele’s work office, or a bar with her friends, as we cut back to Grey waiting for her to return.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Fences (USA, 2016) proves too faithful to the original stageplay to shine as a film

Films adapted from a stageplay have always offered mixed results. While we have classics like ChicagoGlengarry Glen Ross and Sweeney Todd, we often have disasters like Rent and Mamma Mia! The reason for this is either because the stories of these plays or musicals do not have enough cinematic potential to succeed as a film-viewing experience or the director isn’t capable enough to realize that potential.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Winter at Westbeth (Australia, 2016) is a love letter to the power of creativity & pursuing your passion.

Winter at Westbeth is a film that’s all about “the art.” And celebrating it at every age. This documentary looks at three young at heart, elderly, American artists who live in a vibrant, housing complex called Westbeth Artists Housing in New York. It is ultimately a film that is like a love letter to the power of creativity and pursuing your passion.... Continue Reading