Category Archives: Reviews

Film Review: War For The Planet Of The Apes (M, USA, 2017) complements and completes the Apes trilogy perfectly

In the third and final film of the rebooted Planet of the Apes trilogy, we pick up not long after where the previous film left off. The apes are here to stay and it’s only when they come up against a battalion of soldiers that the tentative truce between humans and apes is destroyed and it sends all those affected into full blown war between species. The film takes sci-fi themes and elements, and blends it with the emotional journey of the ape leader and hero Caesar to bring a riveting film that complements and completes the trilogy perfectly.... Continue Reading

Film Review: A Ghost Story (USA, 2017)

David Lowery is a filmmaker whose work I have enjoyed due to thenrestrained approach to his direction, his way of humanizing his characters and his sincere, honest approach to storytelling. Whether it be a small-scale story like Ain’t Them Bodies Saints or a commercial film like the recent Pete’s Dragon, his directorial and screenwriting touch is always apparent.... Continue Reading

Film Review: A Monster Calls (USA, 2017) Strikes At Your Heart

It would be a mistake to write A Monster Calls off as ‘just another one of those’ modern young adult bestsellers that’s gotten the Hollywood treatment. Sure, the narrative of the film is propelled forward by the on-screen performance of an emerging child actor (Lewis MacDougall) and the CGI-performance of a big established figure (Liam Neeson) in much the same way as something like The Golden Compass. ... Continue Reading

Film Review: Dunkirk (USA/UK, 2017) may be the most spectacular war film ever produced

When the name Christopher Nolan is attached to a film, you know you’re in for a blockbuster by any standards. Whether it’s a big budget sci-fi epic (as in Interstellar) or a comic book trilogy (The Dark Knight) to rival any of the genre, Nolan’s work has been virtually unmatched by any of his contemporaries. This week, the latest addition to his stand out filmography hits cinemas, Dunkirk, which sees the writer and director travelling to World War II with a telling of the story of Operation Dynamo and the “Miracle of Dunkirk”.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Paris Can Wait (USA, 2016) proves a dull exercise of endurance

When it comes to names in the film industry, none are more venerable than that of the Coppola’s. Illustriously crafting some of the greatest films in history, from Francis exalting works such as Apocalypse Now to The Godfather and more recently with his daughter’s Sofia success at Cannes with The Beguiled, the name brings an expectation of success. And perhaps it is unfair that that imminent conjecture is present in the directorial debut of Eleanor Coppola with Paris Can Wait. Which in itself is frustratingly blasé. Illuminated by it’s sparse screenplay that plays like a watered down Woody Allen impersonation, Paris Can Wait is a romance drama that severely lacks chemistry and minimal story progression. Making for a highly underwhelming debut.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Edgar Wright is a slave to the rhythm in Baby Driver (USA, 2017)

It’s obvious that great care and thought was put into Baby Driver; we should have expected nothing less from visionary Director Edgar Wright, he who has brought us incredibly unique films like Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World and Shaun of the Dead in the past. With the idea snowballing in his head for decades, road-tested with a music video and teased through the years, Wright has finally sketched his high-concept music-action onto the big screen. The result is a visually sharp, fluid and thrilling piece which ebbs and flows like the soulful breaks which are in constant rotation on Baby’s (Ansel Elgort) collection of iPods. It’s high-octane, expertly choreographed entertainment with a beautifully directed soundtrack, if nothing else.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Netflix’s To the Bone (USA, 2017) will create controversy, but succeeds with strong cast and direction

Films containing subject matter of death or disease, particularly the ones that aim for a teenage audience, tend to be sappy (like My Sister’s Keeper), melodramatic and even deeply misguided, if done wrong. I tend to cringe whenever I hear about another film tacking such subject, but in the case of Netflix’s To the Bone (out Friday), I was quite intrigued.... Continue Reading

Melbourne Documentary Film Festival Review: China’s 3 Dreams checks the aftermath of The Cultural Revolution two generations on

It’s been more than forty years since Emperor Mao Zedong passed, yet the events of the Revolution remain a foreign subject to much of China’s youth. Beneath the doctored history, propaganda and piecemeal curriculum, the impact of Mao’s leadership remains present in the generation that survived it.... Continue Reading

Melbourne Documentary Film Festival Review: The Orb playfully profiled in Lunar Orbit (Canada, 2016)

If you have never heard of The Orb before I would recommend listening to their 1989 hit A Huge Ever Growing Pulsating Brain That Rules from the Centre of the Ultraworld. Even just reading that title would be enough to vaguely understand what The Orb is about and what they continue to represent.... Continue Reading

Film Review: It Comes at Night (USA, 2017) is a nightmare filled with suspense

It would be easy to expect a horror film from the trailer of It Comes At Night, but those familiar with Trey Edwards Shults’ debut feature Krisha should know better. Though he may not be quite skilled at the in-your-face scare, Shults is clearly an intelligent and unique voice for those who love to mix darker shades with their taut family dramas. The 28 year old director is clearly fixated on more heady family dynamics, and tackling a post-apocalyptic scenario seems to be the perfect funnel for his quiet and conflicted moral quandaries with terrifying implications.... Continue Reading