Category Archives: Reviews

Film Review: Bad Moms 2 (USA, 2017) is not for the taint-hearted

Ahh yes, the cinematic comedy sequel. These past several years, we have gotten many comedic sequels, whether they were made by popular demand, the means of nostalgia or the fact that Hollywood is running out of ideas.... Continue Reading

AMW Film Festival Review: Breaking The Mould (Australia, 2017) is a compelling documentary about Australia’s female musicians

If there was Australia’s answer to the film, Play Your Gender, then Breaking The Mould is it. This music documentary includes interviews with Australian artists about their thoughts and experiences with gender in the local industry. The film is an interesting one about our history and it is something that should help shape the conversation around what should happen next.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Three Summers (Australia, 2017) is an amiable comedy about diversity

Three Summers is a film that is as light and breezy as its title suggests. It’s also an ensemble comedy that is written and directed by the legendary, Ben Elton. The latter is known for his novels and the TV shows: The Young Ones and Blackadder. In Three Summers he creates a warm-hearted and well-intentioned story about Australian race relations. The message is that we should all embrace diversity and listen to each other’s stories. While it’s excellent to see a film about Australia actually reflect the people from this wonderful land of Oz, it’s a damn pity that the plot is so lacking.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Loving Vincent (UK, 2017) is an ambitious work of art

The Beatles sang “All you need is love” but they weren’t talking about movies. The film, Loving Vincent is one that is positively brimming with love. It was a labour, a passion project and it’s one of its kind that reads like a love letter to its namesake. But while the final result is something that is visually perfect and unparalleled, it’s a shame that the storyline is one that is so prosaic it’s practically paint-by-numbers.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Thor: Ragnarok (USA, 2017) may be the best entry into the MCU yet

Thor: Ragnarok hits Australian cinemas tomorrow, and by now you’ve heard that this Marvel series’ third instalment lives up to expectations. Helmed by the great Kiwi director Taika Waititi, who assembled a cast of returning favourites and a few excellent additions from his own repertoire, Thor: Ragnarok takes the Marvel Cinematic Universe to new heights, delivering what may be the most entertaining, funny and well balanced entry yet. So you can tell this review isn’t going to differ much from what you’ve heard already. But I do want to delve into a few key reasons why this film succeeds above some stiff competition.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Brigsby Bear (USA, 2017) is a peculiar yet heartfelt viewing experience

When you hear a film that is green-lit and it is basically a vehicle for an SNL star, chances are that one would expect the film to be bad. Films like A Night at the Roxbury, Superstar and The Ladies Man are all garbage. That said, some of them do gain a cult following over time like Hot Rod and MacGruber, and there are also some that are genuinely funny, like the Wayne’s World films, Mean Girls and others.... Continue Reading

Byron Bay Film Festival Film Review: An American In Texas (USA, 2017) is a film for the disenfranchised

It’s a hard fought ninety-seven minutes for the protagonists in An American in Texas, but it’s a fight they could never really win. In Anthony Pedone’s latest, it’s the early 90’s and the U.S has its sights set on a war in the Middle East. As the effects of the conflict settle across the States, we meet a group of friends looking for their way out of small town Texas.... Continue Reading

Greek Film Festival Review: Mythopathy (Notias) (Greece, 2016) is a coming-of-age story that should appeal to Greek audiences

Mythopathy (Notias) is a film about a boy. Except he’s not just any old kid. This child is one that experiences heartbreak in a novel way. When it happens, he looks towards ancient Greek mythology and stories and he changes aspects of these to suit his own narrative. This coming-of-age story is emotional and imaginative at times but it’s also a little forgettable and difficult to understand at others.... Continue Reading

Cunard British Film Festival Review: That Good Night (UK, 2017) is a dull adaption of a stage play that grapples with morality

That Good Night is a film that could be been called “The Last Night.” This is because it’s a drama about second chances and forgiveness. This handsome film is the last one that the late Sir John Hurt acted in and while it has some intriguing moments, it ultimately suffers from being a play that has been stretched out in order to be adapted for the big screen.... Continue Reading