Category Archives: Reviews

Film Review: Don’t Tell (Australia, 2017) doesn’t serve its source material justice

May I set the scene? On a farm in Queensland, 22-year- old Lyndall (Sara West) is talking to lawyer Stephen Roche (Aden Young) about her willingness to face the might of the Anglican Church in court over the abuse she suffered in boarding school. She asks about Bob Myers (Jack Thompson), the barrister who would represent her in court. With a thousand-yard squint, Stephen lists the barrister’s many qualities, pauses, then calls him a prick. One person at the back of the theatre laughs. Apparently, they didn’t see it coming.... Continue Reading

Blu-Ray Review: Assassin’s Creed (USA, 2016) delivers an impressively jam-packed single disc release

The majority of videogame films are, for a lack of a better term, complete tosh. From catastrophes like Street Fighter, Super Mario Bros. and most of Uwe Boll‘s filmography to films that are close to viewer satisfaction like Final Fantasy VII – Advent Children and Ace Attorney, the reputation of videogame films is not something you would proudly put on a pedestal.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Snatched (USA, 2017) is an uneven caper with more faces than a hundred watches

A more appropriate title for the film Snatched would be “Botched” because this was a wasted opportunity. The movie is an uneven one starring comedian Amy Schumer and Hollywood’s own, the truly wonderful Goldie Hawn making her silver-screen comeback after a 15 year hiatus. It’s one that has some decent-enough ingredients but the overall combination plays out like a holiday in hell.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Ridley Scott tugs on existential threads with Alien: Covenant (USA, 2017)

2012’s Prometheus marked the beginning of a franchised prequel to Ridley Scott’s original Alien, not only taking fans back to the origins of this iconic sci-fi franchise, but diving deeper into the meaty philosophies such a concept brings, finding purpose with the motif of creation. The introduction of synthetic android David (Michael Fassbender) emerged as the vehicle for this great change in shift and tone; however, not granting this character believable motivations, and creating dynamics between him and the film’s human characters that felt contrived at best, spoiled what was otherwise an intriguing build-up to the Alien universe. Alien: Covenant could be seen as Scott attempting to correct the ills that weighed Prometheus down, while giving us the same enhanced visual experience the 2012 film became known for. ... Continue Reading

Film Review: The Zookeeper’s Wife (USA, 2017) is a beautifully told true story

The Zookeeper’s Wife follows the real events of the owners’ of the Warsaw Zoo in Poland from 1939 until 1946. It centres on their moral struggle of not being a mere bystander of the ghettos and executions during the Holocaust. It’s a film that has the rare potential to educate  its audience with a fascinating story, without it feeling overly dramatised. The facts of the film appear to remain intact, while also giving a voice to the often unspoken Polish perspective of the Second World War.... Continue Reading

Gold Coast Film Festival Review: Out Of The Shadows (Australia, 2017) makes promises it cannot fulfil

The opening moments of Out Of The Shadows are among its best. The first scene, a tracking shot through a murder scene with grievously damaged bodies, an upset detective and an unsettling atmosphere set by the colour grade and sound, promises a clever indie horror that for the most part, the film fails to deliver.... Continue Reading

Film Review: The Innocents (Poland/France, 2016) is a remarkable, must-see film

Films based on true events are often met with a mixed response; audience left to question the validity of the liberties its filmmakers have taken. Though it can render some films as potentially predictable or even unbelievable, others can be inspiring and heart-wrenching. In the case of The Innocents, we find cinema that belongs to the latter camp; quietly powerful, thanks to a subtle approach to storytelling and assured direction.... Continue Reading

Gold Coast Film Festival Review: The Osiris Child: Science Fiction Volume One (Australia, 2016) is Star Wars on a shoestring

In ninety-five minutes, The Osiris Child recreates the past twenty years of sci-fi. It’s a fast blend of genre styles new and old, reaching screens in the format of a graphic novel and touching bases with every ‘humanity in crisis’ story ever told. While never profound, The Osiris Child achieves its vision, but the lack of storytelling stunts the potential of the Aussie sci-fi flick.... Continue Reading

Gold Coast Film Festival Review: My Entire High School Sinking Into The Sea (USA, 2016) is high school through a kaleidoscope

My Entire High School Sinking Into The Sea is a psychedelic trip through four storeys of a floating high school. About as bad of a place as someone would want to take a transcendental journey, but for the main characters it’s an edifying one, filled with colour, strange visuals and awkward relationships.... Continue Reading