Category Archives: Reviews

Film Review: HBO’s The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is a vital bio-pic about the most important woman in medical history

The name Henrietta Lacks may not mean an awful lot to some people but in reality it should be one of the most famous names in history. Lacks is responsible for revolutionising modern medicine and contributing to every recent major medical breakthrough from vaccines for polio, HPV and the flu-shot; to IVF and treatments for cancer and AIDs. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is an excellent bio-pic that gives some long-overdue credit to where it is due.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Their Finest (UK, 2016) is a consistent delight from beginning to end

Lone Scherfig is a filmmaker who has always frustrated me, delivering a mixed bag of films amongst her career. Her Dutch films were great, but apart from An Education, her films were ultimately flops, especially the turgid One Day.... Continue Reading

Film Review: The Fate of the Furious (USA, 2017) is completely aware of how ridiculous it is

An impressively persistent beast of sorts, the Fast & Furious franchise has become one of the most lucrative commodities of today’s industry, despite an initial series of less-than sequels that threatened to burn the title out before it had a chance to properly compete.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Colossal (Canada/Spain, 2017) is a miraculous achievement

Nacho Vigalondo has always been an exciting filmmaker for me. Ever since I saw his first feature film Timecrimes, I’ve always wanted to see more of this work. His handling of genre film and melding it with themes of humanity or topical themes has always fascinated and thrilled me.... Continue Reading

Blu-Ray Review: The single disc release of Doctor Strange (USA, 2016) arrives jam-packed

As we now roll into Phase 3 of the Marvel Cinematic Universe we are pulled to the beginning of one character’s story. Doctor Strange is Marvel’s step back to delivering an origin story for a new superhero but in some ways this film is a giant leap forward in universe building. It’s hard to fathom that we are now at 14 films and the Marvel juggernaut keeps on churning out blockbuster after blockbuster with rarely a falter. This is yet another notch in the belt for the studio as it expands its list of characters and barrels towards the impending Infinity War extravaganza. Go forth for our somehwat slightly spoilery review.... Continue Reading

Film Review: A Silent Voice (Japan, 2017) is an authentic and delicate coming-of-age story

Naoko Yamada’s A Silent Voice is an authentic and delicate coming-of-age story exploring a tale of romance and redemption. The animation is based on the manga series of the same name from 2013-2014 by Yoshitoki Ōima. A Silent Voice provides a fruitful outlook on the future of Japanese anime, and its success in western markets, particularly with the end of the legendary Studio Ghibli (See My Neighbor Totoro, Princess Monoke, Spirited Way) nearing.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Personal Shopper (USA, 2016) falls flat with its supernatural elements

Poor Maureen (Kristen Stewart). Her boss, Kyra (Nora von Waldstätten) is impossible, sending her all over Europe for clothes and shoes she is too rich and famous to buy for herself. On top of that, her twin brother died a few months ago, and he still hasn’t contacted her from the beyond, even though he promised.... Continue Reading

Film Review: CHiPs (MA15+) (USA, 2017) seldom earns its comedy tag

After proving himself a competent director and screenwriter with the rather modest (at least in comparison) action/comedy Hit & Run in 2012, Dax Shepard unfortunately fails to pair the aforementioned genres together again with CHiPs, an extremely loose adaptation of the popular 1977 television series, which attempts to blend sordid humour with high-grade action and frustratingly fumbles in the process.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Dance Academy: The Movie (Australia, 2017) still knows how to create great teen drama

Dance Academy was one of the shows that defined by teenage years. I was by no means a dancer; yet the representation of real, raw teenage issues was presented in an Australian spotlight – especially on a network that was rather lukewarm at the time (ABC3, now branded as ABCME) was addictive for an entire generation of Australian school kids.... Continue Reading