Category Archives: Reviews

SXSW Film Review: The Most Hated Woman in America (USA, 2017) is Netflix at its best

There’s no doubt about it, Netflix are on a path to global domination. With a slew of well received original TV programming to their name already, the streaming giant have now turned their attention to taking on the film industry and the Hollywood studio system. The exceptional biopic The Most Hated Woman in America is their latest attempt to fight this traditional film model, and if it is anything to go by, I would say they have already won the war.... Continue Reading

SXSW Film Review: The Light of the Moon (USA, 2017) is more than a victim’s story, but a tale of human complexity

Bonnie is young and worldly, holds a job as an architect and lives in NYC. She has good friends, a pretty good social life and is in a stable relationship with a man who is equally as upwardly mobile, enjoying the same perks as anyone with a career in a city able to hold the young and ambitious.... Continue Reading

SXSW Film Review: Pornocracy (France, 2016) is a sad indictment on the big business that is the ever-growing porn industry

Porn is a big business. In just six years the planet has watched over a million years’ worth of videos and 100 billion pages are visited and streamed annually. But is there a dark side to the industry? Ovidie, a French journalist and former porn-star attempts to answer this question in her documentary film, Pornocracy, which will have its world premiere at SXSW.... Continue Reading

AF French Film Festival Review: Daguerrotype (France, Belgium, 2016) has its flaws, but creates the perfect eerie atmosphere

Best known for his contribution to Japanese horror, director Kiyoshi Kurosawa brings an interesting take on a ghost story. Daguerrotype (Le Secret de la Chambre Noire) follows a Parisian named Jean (Tahar Rahim) who is hired to be an assistant to the elusive photographer Stéphane (Olivier Gourmet). With Jean’s help, they create heart-stopping daguerreotypes, an old form of permanent photography which captured images on silver-coated plates. These images were often of Stéphane’s beautiful daughter and muse, Marie (Constance Rousseau), who wishes to escape from the confines of their home and her father, and sees Jean as her hope to freedom. As the story progresses, bizarre things start to stir within the house.... Continue Reading

AF French Film Festival Review: Planetarium (France/Belgium, 2016) is supernaturally addictive, but not as intriguing as it aims to be

A strong taste of the old is present in Planetarium, as Natalie Portman leads a dual-language spoken film about not only the ghosts of the supernatural around us, but also those which come from within before the dawning of a new war era.... Continue Reading

SXSW Film Review: Through The Repellent Fence (USA, 2017) uses art to make an important political statement

As Donald Trump continues promoting his idea of building a wall between the US and Mexico it’s heartening to see that there are some people taking a different approach. Through The Repellent Fence: A Land Art Film is a documentary about a land art installation that attempted to reinforce the notion that borders are an arbitrary idea and that some fences cannot divide people. This is ultimately an insightful and hopeful tale about an important and relevant issue in politics.... Continue Reading

SXSW Film Review: Inheritance (USA, 2017) is a powerful piece on finding closure and oneself

When Mara (Jessica Kaye) returns to her childhood home of Belize bringing her lover Aaron (Daniel Ahearn) with the hope to reconnect with her estranged father and brother who live there. After landing, she is met with the heart-breaking news that her father has just passed away, shortly before his 70th birthday. Mara is distraught but does not tell her brother Ben (Mark Webber) about it. Tensions arise between them but when Ben overdoses on their father’s medications, Mara is forced to care for him. Drunk at all-night wake Mara reveals secrets about the father, changing forever the relationships of those closest to him. Mara soon learns that she must embrace her past while continuing to fight for intimacy at the present.... Continue Reading

SXSW Film Review: Flesh and Blood (USA, 2017) is a harrowing look into the life of a fractured man and his family

It’s hard not to feel a large sense of relief after reaching the end of Mark Webber‘s latest directorial piece that is Flesh and Blood. Not because the film was a tough watch (which in a way, it is), but rather because you are given the chance to leave the cinema and return to what is hopefully, a life far less difficult and fractured than that of Mark Webber’s on-screen portrayal.... Continue Reading