Category Archives: Reviews

Film Review: Girls Trip (USA, 2017) is a hilarious time thanks to an energetically raunchy script

Director Malcolm D. Lee is a filmmaker whose work has been quite the mixed bag. While he has strong pieces of work like the action/comedy cult hit Undercover Brother, The Best Man films and the criminally underseen coming-of-age Roll Bounce, he also has terrible pieces of work (which is one way to put it) like Welcome Home Roscoe Jenkins (one of many examples that made me almost hate Martin Lawrence) and Scary Movie 5 of all things (a perfect example of kicking a corpse and setting it on fire).... Continue Reading

Film Review: God’s Own Country (UK, 2017) is a moody and haunting emotional journey

As easy as it is to liken God’s Own Country to the similarly themed Brokeback Mountain, doing so is only ultimately stripping Francis Lee‘s film of its own identity.  A moody and haunting emotional journey for its protagonists, God’s Own Country is a slow burning, though rewarding drama propelled by a duo of strong performances from relative unknowns Josh O’Connor and Alec Secareanu as farmhands who unexpectedly ignite a passion within each other.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Small Town Killers (Denmark, 2017) never completely commits to its nasty premise

Like fellow Danish filmmakers Lars von Trier and Nicholas Winding Refn, Ole Bornedal made the leap from his homeland to Hollywood, though he opted for more an entertaining stance on his career as opposed to the heavy artistry his peers practiced; Bornedal was behind the rather unspectacular 2012 haunted house pic The Possession, whilst von Trier and Refn helmed such respective controversial pieces as Antichrist and Only God Forgives.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Ali’s Wedding (Australia, 2017) is a warm comedy with a big heart

It’s a mad, mad, mad, mad world. The events depicted in Ali’s Wedding, the new Australian film and Muslim rom-com are based on true events. Unfortunately. This comedy is a funny and vibrant look at life in Australia for a family of Middle Eastern immigrants and like Looking For Alibrandi, The Family Law and Acropolis Now, it is another strong voice in the chorus of individuals living in multicultural Australia.... Continue Reading

Film Review: The Hitman’s Bodyguard (USA, 2017) is a funny, familiar buddy-cop ride

Sometimes it’s not always necessary for a film to be unique or spectacular or innovative for it to be enjoyable. Sometimes all we need is for it to be fun and ridiculous and easily digestible for it to provide that escapism. The Hitman’s Bodyguard brings together two particular Hollywood actors who have their own distinct “brand” to lead an action-comedy-buddy-cop-type of film that doesn’t intend to set the world on fire but prefers to just kick back and enjoy itself in an almost meta way.... Continue Reading

Netflix Review: Death Note (USA, 2017) has good intentions, but fails in the process

Whitewashing! Americanized! Lack of ethnicity! Yeah, I’m gonna talk about that in great detail, just to make that clear. Anyway, a lot of negative buzz has been going around this project due the things mentioned above and it definitely is a valid argument since the source material is distinctly Japanese. So to retroactively set the story in another location would potentially leave a lot of things lost in translation, so to speak.... Continue Reading

Melbourne International Film Festival Review: The Killing of a Sacred Deer (USA/UK, 2017) is the product of skilful filmmaking

It’s not often that an art-house thriller comes together so perfectly to create an unsettling horror capable of antagonising your thoughts even after you’ve walked out the cinema doors. But that is exactly what The Killing of a Sacred Deer does, the fifth feature film of Greek auteur Yorgos Lanthimos. As a darkly comic rendition of an ancient Greek tragedy, the myth of Iphigenia, Lanthimos creates this body of work with a sinister flair that explores the role of accountability and vengeance in our modern world.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Maudie (Canada, 2016) is a colourful portrait which proves that love & talent can be found in unlikely places

If Forrest Gump where a female, Canadian folk artist you would get Maudie. This film is a biopic about the late artist, Maud Lewis who was born a “little different” and whose story is one that is likely to charm some theatregoers. This movie is ultimately a rather romanticised view of her creative and impoverished life.... Continue Reading