Tag Archives: AF French Film Festival

AF French Film Festival Review: Tran Anh Hung’s Eternity (France, 2016) is a tone poem brought to life

Though I am Vietnamese, because I was raised in Australia for all of my life, I never really experienced much of Vietnamese culture. However, there were some films that I had watched that had always stuck with me, and those were the works of Vietnamese director Tran Anh Hung.... Continue Reading

AF French Film Festival Review: Being 17 (France, 2016) is a thoughtful coming-of-age story

If Being 17 is any indication, the 2017 Alliance Francaise French Film Festival is off to a great start. Coming-of-age films are a genre that I deeply appreciate. With no need of a strong reliance on plot, seeing the progression of a protagonist through young adulthood can be compelling on a cinematic level.... Continue Reading

AF French Film Festival Review: Monsieur Chocolat (France, 2016) is an emotional ride that leaves you in deep contemplation

Breathtaking and magical, Monsieur Chocolat (directed by Roschdy Zem) is one to watch if you want to experience a Parisian night. Immerse yourself in the world of 19th-century French circus and follow the biopic story of Chocolat (Omar Sy). He journeys from a performer acting as the “cannibal” to a more respected position as a clown in a duo with Foottit (James Thiérrée). Together, they reach fame but things start to fall apart when Chocolat wishes to be more and ambitions clash.... Continue Reading

AF French Film Festival Review: Daguerrotype (France, Belgium, 2016) has its flaws, but creates the perfect eerie atmosphere

Best known for his contribution to Japanese horror, director Kiyoshi Kurosawa brings an interesting take on a ghost story. Daguerrotype (Le Secret de la Chambre Noire) follows a Parisian named Jean (Tahar Rahim) who is hired to be an assistant to the elusive photographer Stéphane (Olivier Gourmet). With Jean’s help, they create heart-stopping daguerreotypes, an old form of permanent photography which captured images on silver-coated plates. These images were often of Stéphane’s beautiful daughter and muse, Marie (Constance Rousseau), who wishes to escape from the confines of their home and her father, and sees Jean as her hope to freedom. As the story progresses, bizarre things start to stir within the house.... Continue Reading