Tag Archives: Documentary

Film Review: The Eagle Huntress (G) (UK/MONG/USA, 2016) follows an inspiring subject

I have to admit, I don’t watch a lot of documentaries, but I’ve loved the ones I’ve seen. Some of them haven’t felt like documentaries at all, mainly because the stories behind them are a little too one-sided or hard to believe. Films like Super Size Me and Bowling for Columbine have been accused of being false, manipulative as well as misleading. I start off with this because the documentary, The Eagle Huntress, which is released in select cinemas this week, has been accused of being staged, scripted and even acted. But even factoring all of this, does that clench the final verdict that the documentary is a bad viewing experience? In this case, yes and no.... Continue Reading

SXSW Film Review: Mission Control: The Unsung Heroes of Apollo (UK, 2017) is a love letter to NASA’s rocket men

Stop and take a moment to think about what you were doing at the age of 27 or what you will do if it’s yet to come. If you’re a musician it is likely that you are dead but if you were working at NASA during the Apollo era then you had a hand in putting man on the moon. Mission Control: The Unsung Heroes of Apollo is a documentary that takes a leaf out of Hidden Figures’ book because it puts the focus on the boffins that achieved great things by working at mission control and it is one truly fascinating story.... Continue Reading

SXSW Film Review: Through The Repellent Fence (USA, 2017) uses art to make an important political statement

As Donald Trump continues promoting his idea of building a wall between the US and Mexico it’s heartening to see that there are some people taking a different approach. Through The Repellent Fence: A Land Art Film is a documentary about a land art installation that attempted to reinforce the notion that borders are an arbitrary idea and that some fences cannot divide people. This is ultimately an insightful and hopeful tale about an important and relevant issue in politics.... Continue Reading

Aussie director Matthew Salleh talks about his mouth-watering SXSW Premiere documentary Barbecue

Ahead of its premiere on Friday at SXSW in Austin, Texas, we caught up with Australian born, US based director Matthew Salleh to talk about his new documentary feature, Barbecue. The film takes us to 12 countries, from Shisanyama in South Africa, to Engangsgrill in Sweden and everywhere in between to talk about meat: how we cook it and how it reflects the pride of a nation. In our chat, we talk about the art of the BBQ, filming around the world, some wise Texan words and his earlier premieres at the Sydney Film Festival.... Continue Reading

Ten things we learnt from the E-Team Sydney screening and Q & A

Sydney recently played host to a screening of the film, E-Team, a documentary about Human Rights Watch’s Emergency Team, a group of fearless individuals that visit the front lines in order to document atrocities that are occurring. There was also a Q & A after the film with Elaine Pearson, the Australian director of Human Rights Watch and Brian Thomson, the international editor of SBS World News. Here are ten things The AU Review learnt from this event.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Winter at Westbeth (Australia, 2016) is a love letter to the power of creativity & pursuing your passion.

Winter at Westbeth is a film that’s all about “the art.” And celebrating it at every age. This documentary looks at three young at heart, elderly, American artists who live in a vibrant, housing complex called Westbeth Artists Housing in New York. It is ultimately a film that is like a love letter to the power of creativity and pursuing your passion.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Jim: The James Foley Story (USA, 2016) tugs at your heartstrings

Most people were introduced to James “Jim” Foley when he appeared in a bright orange jumpsuit and reports (and video) confirmed that he had been the first American citizen to be murdered by ISIS. It was a moment where the Islamic State had stripped away his humanity and reduced Foley to a casualty. In the film, Jim: The James Foley Story, those closest to him set about reclaiming Foley’s story and offering us a glimpse into his complex and good-natured character.... Continue Reading

JIFF Review: In Search Of Israeli Cuisine (USA, 2016) is a joyful celebration of food

If the prospect of Israeli cuisine leaves you hungry to learn more then there is one documentary film for you. In Search of Israeli Cuisine attempts to answer the question, “What is Israeli cuisine?” In doing so it examines a diverse range of different influences and food styles on Israeli food, which ranges from street food and cafes to home cooking and fine dining, plus everything in between. This film will make your mouth water, will leave you wishing smell-o-vision existed and will whet your appetite for more.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Netflix’s Amanda Knox (USA, 2016) shines a light on trial by media

The trailers for the documentary Amanda Knox (which debuts on Netflix in late September) questions whether the eponymous star did or didn’t commit the murder of British exchange student, Meredith Kercher. The crime that occurred in Perugia Italy in 2007 had an investigation that had more holes than a pile of Swiss cheese. This documentary film focuses on a number of the key players associated with the case and ultimately throws up some very serious questions with respect to the investigation.... Continue Reading

SUFF Review: Help Us Find Sunil Tripathi (USA, 2015) an emotional, thoughtful and important documentary

Help Us Find Sunil Tripathi is an excellent documentary and cautionary tale. It tells the story of a Brown University student who went missing in 2013 and how he was wrongly accused of being one of the Boston Marathon bombers. The film is a sensitive one about an amazing character and a sad indictment of social media and how a vocal few could turn into digital vigilantes and participate in a crazy witch-hunt.... Continue Reading