Tag Archives: Four and a Half Stars

Film Review: American Honey (MA15+) (UK/USA, 2016) is a hypnotic, optimistic and euphoric experience

Director Andrea Arnold is probably one of the most distinct British directors working today. Her visual eye, her ability to capture slice-of-life moments in a compellingly cinematic way, and especially her way of extracting fantastic performances out of non-actors. Her films like Fish Tank (2009) and Wuthering Heights (2011) are true examples of such. ... Continue Reading

Film Review: Doctor Strange (M) (USA, 2016) is visually and aurally exquisite

As we now roll into Phase 3 of the Marvel Cinematic Universe we are pulled to the beginning of one character’s story. Doctor Strange is Marvel’s step back to delivering an origin story for a new superhero but in some ways this film is a giant leap forward in universe building. It’s hard to fathom that we are now at 14 films and the Marvel juggernaut keeps on churning out blockbuster after blockbuster with rarely a falter. This is yet another notch in the belt for the studio as it expands its list of characters and barrels towards the impending Infinity War extravaganza. Go forth for our somehwat slightly spoilery review.... Continue Reading

TV Review: Ash vs Evil Dead Season 2, Episode 3 “Last Call” (USA, 2016) reunites the holy trinity

Ash is an idiot. Not only did he lose his Delta to a bunch of teens he pissed off in last weeks episode, but it also had the Necronomicon in the back seat. But one amazing thing comes out of all of this: Last Call reunites Bruce Campbell and Ted Raimi (brother of Sam, and third deity of that holy trinity).... Continue Reading

SUFF Review: Help Us Find Sunil Tripathi (USA, 2015) an emotional, thoughtful and important documentary

Help Us Find Sunil Tripathi is an excellent documentary and cautionary tale. It tells the story of a Brown University student who went missing in 2013 and how he was wrongly accused of being one of the Boston Marathon bombers. The film is a sensitive one about an amazing character and a sad indictment of social media and how a vocal few could turn into digital vigilantes and participate in a crazy witch-hunt.... Continue Reading

DVD Review: Green Room (USA, 2016) proves itself a fantastic thriller

Green Room is one of those movies that isn’t at all hesitant about sneaking up on you and showing you exactly what you’re in for, be it through taboo subject matter (white supremacy) ultra violence or a range of truly sadistic characters. And once you accept what your next hour and half is going to be like, you’ll find yourself suitably entertained.... Continue Reading

MIFF Review: Sonita (Iran, 2015) offers a lot to contemplate

All too often, the scene of refugees fleeing from the religious violence of Afghanistan and the Taliban is a common image to appear on our television screens and the news publications that slips into our Facebook feeds. The documentary filmmaker, Rokhsareh Ghaem Maghami, uncovers a more distressing cultural issue ingrained within Afghani traditions of the misogynistic and patriarchal culture where young women are sold to men in marriage.... Continue Reading

MIFF Review: Train to Busan (South Korea, 2016) may have just changed the Zombie genre

If 2014’s World War Z set a precedent for anything, it was that you can unequivocally produce a zombie flick without copious amounts of gore and severed limbs and still have it be entertaining. South Korean film Train to Busan follows this blueprint and improves upon it in a number of of satisfying ways.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Sausage Party (MA15+) (USA, 2016) is hilariously fun and… thought-provoking?

Seth Rogen has always been associated with stoner humour and raunchy comedy, but in the case of Sausage Party, he takes it to a whole new level. With animated films that have anthropomorphised objects like toys (i.e. the Toy Story films) and cars (i.e. Cars), Rogen had the idea to anthropomorphise consumer products while retaining his own brand of humour.... Continue Reading

MIFF Review: Elle (France, 2016) is sensationally subversive

Elle, the latest from Dutch provocateur Paul Verhoeven, is sensationally subversive. Part unnerving psychosexual thriller, part searing familial comedy, the film commences disturbingly with the sounds of the violent rape of the film’s protagonist, Michèle LeBlanc (Isabelle Huppert), in her Parisian home.... Continue Reading