Tag Archives: Four Stars

Film Review: Unsane (USA, 2018) is an eerie and timely shocker with a powerhouse performance from Claire Foy

With films like Sex, Lies and Videotape and King of the Hill, Steven Soderbergh is known to be one of the greatest filmmakers to come from independent cinema. But he became a bigger name when he ventured into commercial filmmaking with crime films like Out of Sight, The Limey and the Ocean’s film series.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Gurrumul (Australia, 2018) is a striking and emotive portrait of one of Australia’s greatest musical talents

With Gurrumul, director Paul Damien Williams has created a striking and emotive portrait of one of Australia’s greatest musical talents – Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu. But more than that, Gurrumul also affords us all a glimpse into the cultural life and traditions of the Yolngu people in North Eastern Arnhem Land, in what are some of the most visually striking moments of the film.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Ghost Stories (UK, 2018) is a refreshing and original horror anthology

With high replay value and some clever pacing, Andy Nyman and Jeremy Dyson have transposed their West End play Ghost Stories to the big screen with a refreshing eye for originality, spinning a grand three-part horror anthology into one thoroughly entertaining and unpredictable film that never stops subtly building towards its tremendous finale. And that’s ultimately where the genius in what Nyman and Dyson’s project lies, building an engaging central narrative that wraps around these individually fascinating and genuinely terrifying ghost stories; it works both as a horror anthology – a rarity these days, but with homage to classics like Dead of Night and Tales from the Crypt – and as a cohesive film.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Isle Of Dogs (USA, 2018) is a tail of love and adventure in the face of adversity

Director Wes Anderson has gradually been making a name for himself as a quintessentially quirky auteur with his unique but meticulously detailed style. So it is no surprise at all that his latest stop-motion animation feature, Isle Of Dogs, is probably his most fine tuned film to date. Bringing a heartwarming tale about love, loyalty and adventure in the face of adversity and doggos… lots of cute adorable doggos.... Continue Reading

Film Review: The Party (UK, 2017) delivers pitch-black comedy at its best

Black comedies can be a very hard genre to pull off. Since it dwells within serious issues that could potentially be seen as taboos within the genre, it requires a certain balance between empathy, humour and darkness. But like all films, they have to have a certain amount of humanity for the audience to cling onto.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Blockers (USA, 2018) is a hilarious and heartwarming piece of work

2018’s anticipated teen comedy Blockers is helmed by a lot of “first-timers”. Making her directorial debut is  Kay Cannon, mainly known as a scriptwriter for the successful Pitch Perfect films as well as the TV series 30 Rock. And then newcomers Jim and Brian Kehoe have made their film screenwriting debut. This can often spell disaster for a teen comedy – so do these newcomers, under the vision of Producers like Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg, bring a fresh voice to the genre, or is this one film you should block from your viewing plans?... Continue Reading

SXSW Film Review: Leigh Whannel crafts an incredibly fun sci-fi horror with Upgrade (Australia, 2018)

Technology gone overboard is a sci-fi trope that has been done to death in cinema, but it’s a pleasure to watch stories that are still bringing fresh takes on the theme. The latest is Upgrade, a techno-horror slash detective thriller written and directed by Leigh Whannell who moves away from the past few years of supernatural scares with the Insidious franchise and finds himself a bit closer to the gritty horror-thriller territory that first made him famous back in 2004 with Saw. This isn’t no torture-porn outing though, focusing on the paranoia of a technologically advanced world with Logan Marshall-Green’s oddly-named Grey Trace serving as Leigh’s conduit.... Continue Reading

SXSW Film Review: Boots Riley holds no punches in kafkaesque comedy Sorry to Bother You (USA, 2018)

Boots Riley has over two decades of powerful, biting and important work behind him as emcee of The Coup, so Sorry for Bothering You, his directorial debut, isn’t as big of a leap as it appears to be for the artist. Well, it’s not big in the sense that smart political satire is anything new for Boots, and there’s no doubt that his work with the seminal rap band has given him a unique approach to the film world. That approach is translated into this multifaceted comedy-drama which aggressively tugs on the threads of institutionalised racism, power structures and forced-labour and watches them all fall into a surreal, mind-warping dystopia of anthropomorphism, cocaine and orgies. It’s as weird and lovingly unique as it sounds.... Continue Reading