Tag Archives: Four Stars

TV Review: Fear the Walking Dead Season 3 Episode 4 “100” is the show’s best yet

“100” just may be the best episode Fear the Walking Dead has done to date. Daniel Salazar (Rubén Blades) was always one of the more interesting characters – that isn’t saying much though – in the show, up until the point where the writers made the terrible decision to randomly send him into “crazy” mode and throw a did-he-or-didn’t-he death mystery at us when we last him engulfed in flames. Appearing as the twist to cap of last week’s so-so “TEOTWAWKI”, Salazar brings a lot of promise with his return and so it feels just right giving him a bottle-episode, which Blades carries with aplomb.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: Wind River (USA, 2017) is a tight, often brutal thriller

Having proven his worth as a screenwriter with both Hell or High Water and Sicario, Wind River serves as scribe Taylor Sheridan’s directorial debut.  Arguably arriving with high expectations, Sheridan’s tight, often brutal thriller proves his workings with such professionals as David Mackenzie and Denis Villeneuve has paid off, showcasing an ease behind the lens as he injects the appropriate amount of grit to his dark story.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: Una (UK/USA, 2016) is a gripping abuse drama that thrives through unhesitating commitment

It would have been too easy for a film like Una to result in something unreservedly perfunctory. The fable of the abuse victim confronting her perpetrator has been depicted more than one would wish to count, and the argument can be made that a fair share wishes to portray the subject matter no more than on face value. But whereas for Una, the subject matter goes dramatically deeper in a fashion that is so confronting and so quietly intense, it is difficult to not be magnetised by the results. Headlined by a pair of performers unwaveringly basking in the taboo nature of the source material, Una expertly explores what it means to have power, the stature of sexuality and the unreachability of peace. It is a spellbinding exhibit of the effects of unjustified interaction and an unflinchingly taut piece of filmmaking that deserves to be seen.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: Wild Mouse (Austria, 2017) spectacularly spirals down the rabbit hole of the modern mid-life crisis

Making his directorial debut, penning the script and holding the starring role, Austrian actor Josef Hader has impressed festivals around the world with the dark comedy Wild Mouse – which has had its Australian premiere this week as part of the Sydney Film Festival.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Cars 3 (USA, 2017) is a near-perfect return for the franchise

It has finally arrived! After the teaser trailer that saw Lightning McQueen being absolutely annihilated on the racetrack months ago, we were all left wondering exactly where the Cars franchise had taken us with this all new installment, especially after the disappointing Cars 2 and Disney’s attempt at making it a broader universe with the lacklustre Planes.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: The Farthest (Ireland, 2017) is a documentary of astronomical proportions

I don’t want to make a Star Trek joke – it’d be too obvious and you would only resent me for it – but as much as it pains me, I do need to say that space really is the final frontier. It’s always right there, just outside our atmosphere, and for decades we humans have been trying our best to learn anything and everything we can about it.... Continue Reading

Netflix Review: The third season of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt season is fun, hilarious and surprisingly deep

It doesn’t take very long for the third season of Netflix’s Original Series Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt to remind its audience why it’s such a powerful and unexpected treasure. In 2015, the show first hit Netflix and was praised by critics and general audiences for its humour and overall freshness from the generic television show.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: Spoor (Poland, 2017) explores the extent of one woman’s compassion

Agnieszka Holland creates a character to love and to loath in Spoor, the Polish thriller-comedy that follows one woman’s passion for animal justice in a town that doesn’t share the same sentiments. Spoor, meaning the tracks left by an animal, is a film that rarely falls from the trail, coming together as a poignant comedy with lead actress Agnieszka Mandat-Grabka at the film’s vanguard.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: House of Others (Georgia, 2016) is haunted by the growing pains of war

The ghosts of never-ending war and destruction haunt Rusudan Glurjidze’sHouse of Others, overwhelming every abandoned corner of a ravaged town in rural Georgia. Gloomy and unkind, it’s filled with the type of desolation and helplessness that often pervades films about the devastating human effects of such obnoxious atrocities. Rarely is that atmosphere articulated as well though, with Gluridze offering up a striking, semi-autobiographical tale that connects two families from the opposing sides of a disastrous conflict, watching as they try and piece together some semblance of a life under an oppressive air where there are no winners and losers.... Continue Reading