Tag Archives: Four Stars

Sydney Film Festival Review: Westwood: Punk, Icon, Activist (UK, 2018) is about a style iconoclast & punk who became one fine dame

Westwood: Punk, Icon, Activist shares some things in common with David Bowie’s song, “Fashion” and not just for the obvious fact that Vivienne Westwood is a fashion designer. Consider Bowie’s “Listen to me- don’t listen to me/Talk to me- don’t talk to me/Dance with me- don’t dance with me, no” lyrics. It’s a curious dance straddling the lines between do you/don’t you want to and it’s in this same environment that Westwood operates here. She allowed cameras to follow her around but then she’s gone and publicly denounced the final documentary. In the opening scenes she is exasperated and assumes that looking at the past is “boring.” Westwood is quite possibly the world’s most reluctant interviewee even though she speaks well and has strong principles and opinions and it’s this dichotomy that makes this film such an entertaining one.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: The Breaker Upperers (New Zealand, 2018) is immensely entertaining, genuinely hilarious, and wonderfully heartfelt

Given that we can almost outsource every chore, errand, and activity that come our way, it only makes sense that the unfortunate responsibility that is breaking up with someone be a lucrative business too.  Enter The Breaker Upperers, a duo of frozen-hearted, screwed-over singletons who appear more than happy to break the heart of someone else’s significant other – for the right price of course.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: The Heiresses (Paraguay, 2018) is a low-key, yet compelling character study

If one were to describe this film briefly, The Heiresses could be seen a cross between Wong Kar-wai‘s Happy Together and Albert and David MayslesGrey Gardens. As Kar-wai says about the title of his film, being happy together is being happy with oneself, and it is within that context is where the journey in The Heiresses comes from.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: Disobedience (UK/USA, 2018) is a subtly compelling look into hidden passions and forbidden love

To say that the expectations for this film are quite high is quite superfluous, but it has to be said nonetheless. We have Rachel Weisz, one of the most talented actresses in Hollywood, who’s had a great run of recent films ever since starring in the weird and sweet quasi-dystopian romance The Lobster, and still going strong.... Continue Reading

5 things we learned from Romesh Ranganathan’s new series Just Another Immigrant on Stan

British comedian Romesh Ranganathan has entertained audiences as the Asian Provocateur with his travels to Sri Lanka and America. His latest series, Just Another Immigrant, will premiere exclusively on Stan and takes a leaf out of these previous books. It sees Ranganathan coming to America to crack the U.S. comedy scene with his quirky family members in tow. The show is another hilarious docuseries and we share the top five things we learned:... Continue Reading

Film Review: Tea With The Dames (UK, 2018) is a delightful romp down memory lane you won’t want to leave

There are some viewers who might dismiss Tea With The Dames as “Anecdotage by those in their dotage.” But they’d be wrong. This documentary starring four great dames of the British stage and screen is a fascinating look at some brilliant careers and a revealing look into their respective personalities. There’s also lots of gossip and anecdotage but it’s the most intriguing and colourful variety.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Tully (USA, 2018) is a return-to-form for both Reitman and Cody

If there’s one creative collaboration that many look forward to, it’d have to be between director Jason Reitman and writer Diablo Cody. Their first collaboration was the 2007 comedy-drama Juno. With its hip dialogue, wonderful performances and a refreshing view of the coming-of-age genre (for that time), it was a critically-acclaimed hit that was a huge step for their careers.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Breath (Australia, 2017) thrives on deflecting expectation and wallowing in its own ethereal state

After a near two-decade absence from the Australian film industry, Simon Baker makes a glorious (ahem) splash with the soulful Breath.  Taking cue from the evocative descriptions set about in Tim Winton‘s 2008 novel, Baker proves both assured and affectionate as he takes directorial duties for an equally vivid and placid coming-of-age tale that benefits from its inexperienced ensemble.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Unsane (USA, 2018) is an eerie and timely shocker with a powerhouse performance from Claire Foy

With films like Sex, Lies and Videotape and King of the Hill, Steven Soderbergh is known to be one of the greatest filmmakers to come from independent cinema. But he became a bigger name when he ventured into commercial filmmaking with crime films like Out of Sight, The Limey and the Ocean’s film series.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Gurrumul (Australia, 2018) is a striking and emotive portrait of one of Australia’s greatest musical talents

With Gurrumul, director Paul Damien Williams has created a striking and emotive portrait of one of Australia’s greatest musical talents – Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu. But more than that, Gurrumul also affords us all a glimpse into the cultural life and traditions of the Yolngu people in North Eastern Arnhem Land, in what are some of the most visually striking moments of the film.... Continue Reading