Tag Archives: Four Stars

Film Review: War For The Planet Of The Apes (M, USA, 2017) complements and completes the Apes trilogy perfectly

In the third and final film of the rebooted Planet of the Apes trilogy, we pick up not long after where the previous film left off. The apes are here to stay and it’s only when they come up against a battalion of soldiers that the tentative truce between humans and apes is destroyed and it sends all those affected into full blown war between species. The film takes sci-fi themes and elements, and blends it with the emotional journey of the ape leader and hero Caesar to bring a riveting film that complements and completes the trilogy perfectly.... Continue Reading

TV Review: Game of Thrones Season 7 Episode 1 “Dragonstone” is nothing but power moves

That was one hell of a way to open up Game of Thrones’ seventh season premiere, wasn’t it? Rarely does the show dabble in cold openers, but an enormously satisfying ribbon-cutter was certainly the perfect way to usher in what is now the final 13 episodes (split into two seasons) of what has truly become the definition of “event television”.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Netflix’s To the Bone (USA, 2017) will create controversy, but succeeds with strong cast and direction

Films containing subject matter of death or disease, particularly the ones that aim for a teenage audience, tend to be sappy (like My Sister’s Keeper), melodramatic and even deeply misguided, if done wrong. I tend to cringe whenever I hear about another film tacking such subject, but in the case of Netflix’s To the Bone (out Friday), I was quite intrigued.... Continue Reading

TV Review: Fear the Walking Dead Season 3 Mid-Season Finale trades blood for peace

Fear the Walking Dead’s double-episode finale took the necessary steps to reveal just how far Madison is willing to go protect her family, especially after Travis and everything else that they have gone through since the infection began. It’s a success in that respect, nicely paced while it worked towards one pivotal moment – and a slight twist – that cemented some semblance of peace between Broke Jaw Ranch and Walker’s through blood and betrayal.... Continue Reading

Melbourne Documentary Film Festival Review: The Orb playfully profiled in Lunar Orbit (Canada, 2016)

If you have never heard of The Orb before I would recommend listening to their 1989 hit A Huge Ever Growing Pulsating Brain That Rules from the Centre of the Ultraworld. Even just reading that title would be enough to vaguely understand what The Orb is about and what they continue to represent.... Continue Reading

Film Review: It Comes at Night (USA, 2017) is a nightmare filled with suspense

It would be easy to expect a horror film from the trailer of It Comes At Night, but those familiar with Trey Edwards Shults’ debut feature Krisha should know better. Though he may not be quite skilled at the in-your-face scare, Shults is clearly an intelligent and unique voice for those who love to mix darker shades with their taut family dramas. The 28 year old director is clearly fixated on more heady family dynamics, and tackling a post-apocalyptic scenario seems to be the perfect funnel for his quiet and conflicted moral quandaries with terrifying implications.... Continue Reading

Melbourne Documentary Film Festival Review: The Slippers (Canada, 2016) is unbelievable, whimsical and charming

In the film, The Wizard of Oz Dorothy taps her ruby red slippers and says, “There’s no place like home.” But have you ever wondered where was home for those striking shoes? The documentary, The Slippers is a fascinating film that covers what became of this beloved slice of movie history in a story that is sometimes so strange and bizarre that you couldn’t make this stuff up. It’s a tale that has everything in it from romps through history to thefts, betrayals, conflicting emotions and obsession.... Continue Reading

Melbourne Documentary Film Festival Review: Play Your Gender (Canada, 2016) is an inspiring music documentary that encourages female producers & engineers

Artists like Madonna, Beyoncé, Taylor Swift and Katy Perry are some of the biggest names in the music industry. But in the shadows of these successful women you will see lots of men. When you look behind-the-scenes at the music business it is one big old boys’ club but does it have to be this way? The documentary, Play Your Gender asks why there aren’t more female producers and sound engineers and answers this in a very interesting, well-constructed and engaging way.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Monsieur Chocolat (France, 2016) (France, 2016) is the less colourful counterpart to Moulin Rouge!

Breathtaking and magical, Monsieur Chocolat (directed by Roschdy Zem) is one to watch if you want to experience a Parisian night. Immerse yourself in the world of 19th-century French circus and follow the biopic story of Chocolat (Omar Sy). He journeys from a performer acting as the “cannibal” to a more respected position as a clown in a duo with Foottit (James Thiérrée). Together, they reach fame but things start to fall apart when Chocolat wishes to be more and ambitions clash.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: Vaya (South Africa, 2016) is a brutal coming of age story set in an unforgiving Johannesburg

Like it’s Tsotsitaal namesake meaning “to go”, Vaya, Directed by Akin Omotoso, literally begins on the move. Opening on a train bound to Johannesburg Vaya follows the intertwining paths of three young South Africans journeying from their rural homes in Kwazulu-Natal to eGoli, the city of Gold. All three are tasked with their own promises to fulfil not only to themselves but to their home towns. Unfortunately this living breathing city, a character in it’s own right, tempts them away from their honourable duties as soon as they disembark the train.... Continue Reading