Tag Archives: Melbourne International Film Festival

MIFF Review: Sonita (Iran, 2015) offers a lot to contemplate

All too often, the scene of refugees fleeing from the religious violence of Afghanistan and the Taliban is a common image to appear on our television screens and the news publications that slips into our Facebook feeds. The documentary filmmaker, Rokhsareh Ghaem Maghami, uncovers a more distressing cultural issue ingrained within Afghani traditions of the misogynistic and patriarchal culture where young women are sold to men in marriage.... Continue Reading

MIFF Review: Train to Busan (South Korea, 2016) may have just changed the Zombie genre

If 2014’s World War Z set a precedent for anything, it was that you can unequivocally produce a zombie flick without copious amounts of gore and severed limbs and still have it be entertaining. South Korean film Train to Busan follows this blueprint and improves upon it in a number of of satisfying ways.... Continue Reading

MIFF Review: Certain Women (USA, 2016) is a quiet, gentle piece of cinema

Proving to be the master of quiet filmmaking, Kelly Reichardt has established quite a name for herself within the independent cinematic industry. With slow-burning, patient films like Old Joy and Wendy and Lucy, her newest picture follows the style of her preceding work. Certain Women, an adaptation of short stories by Maile Meloy, shows Reichardt provide contemplative and powerful observations on the lives of women.... Continue Reading

MIFF Review: Little Men (USA, 2016) reaffirms Ira Sachs’ gift for understated human drama

Little Men begins with Jake Jardine (Theo Taplitz) sitting quietly amidst anarchic scenes in a teacher-less classroom. Later that day, home from school, he takes a call from an old friend of his grandfather who, assuming that Jake knows more than he does, clumsily inquires about arrangements for Jake’s grandfather’s funeral. The juxtaposition of these first two scenes hints at director Ira Sachs’ focus here on that betwixt and between state of being – early adolescence.... Continue Reading

MIFF Review: Elle (France, 2016) is sensationally subversive

Elle, the latest from Dutch provocateur Paul Verhoeven, is sensationally subversive. Part unnerving psychosexual thriller, part searing familial comedy, the film commences disturbingly with the sounds of the violent rape of the film’s protagonist, Michèle LeBlanc (Isabelle Huppert), in her Parisian home.... Continue Reading

MIFF Review: Chevalier (Greece, 2015) is a hilarious critique of the male-ego

It’s been said that being at sea tests the limits of friendship and one’s own character. Add a touch of boredom mixed with an abundance of male-ego and you have yourself a manhood-measuring-contest that walks the thin line of manners, morality, and absolute absurdity. Chevalier is a funny and insightful exposé of the masculinity and vulnerability of Greek men, spectacularly captured by Athina Rachel Tsangari, director of Attenburg and producer of Dogtooth.... Continue Reading

MIFF Review: Kim A. Snyder’s documentary Newtown (USA, 2016) is a marvel

In December of 2014, a lone gunman walked into an Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut and shot and killed 20 children and 6 staff members. While most peoples instant response was to condemn the shooter (who killed himself at the scene), many could be forgiven for not instantly considering the parents who lost their sons and daughters. Kim A. Snyder has constructed a chilling documentary in order to shed some light on those most affected by the Sandy Hook Massacre.... Continue Reading

MIFF Review: Toni Erdmann (Germany, 2016) is a meandering delight

Written and directed by Maren Ede, Toni Erdmann is a meandering delight. By turns hilarious and poignant, it concerns the ageing Winfried Conradi’s frequently maladroit attempts to re-establish some sort of a meaningful relationship with his adult daughter, Ines, in the course of a spontaneous trip to visit her in Bucharest, the Romanian capital.... Continue Reading

ACMI to host exclusive limited season of political documentary Weiner

World politics is a joke right now considering what we see on television. It’s become a routine to roll our eyes on every Australian Politician and Donald Trump’s idiocy of banning immigrants to the U.S borders. Good news for those who love watching political documentaries as ACMI in Melbourne will be showcasing Weiner to the big screen, running an exclusive limited season from September 1st.... Continue Reading