Tag Archives: SXSW

Interview: Ari Aster, Alex Wolff and Milly Shapiro on the making of Hereditary

Just about every horror movie leading up to release is dubbed “scariest. ever” because that’s the way hype works. “Scary” is what pulls us into horror movies and often creates unfair expectations which leave us – especially horror buffs – bitterly disappointed. As someone who is fairly well-versed in horror and finds something to love in just about every one he sees, I feel confident in writing that Hereditary is indeed one of, if not the, scariest movies ever made. This isn’t an overstatement, and you’ll find plenty of pieces across the internet which echo the same sentiment. This is as close to evil as a film I have ever seen, and it’s the debut feature from writer and director Ari Aster who has immediately become one of the most exciting in cinema. I write cinema because Hereditary should not be confined to a genre, as horror films usually are; Hereditary is a family drama first, horror film second and, as you’ll read below, that is an important distinction to make in order to truly understand just how terrifying the story is.... Continue Reading

The Jacobson Brothers’ new film Brothers’ Nest is changing the way local productions interact with local cinemas

While the highly anticipated Australian film Brothers’ Nest recently premiered at SXSW earlier this year, that didn’t stop director/producer/star Clayton Jacobson, writer/producer Jaime Browne and producer Jason Byrne from pushing the boundaries of Australian films by establishing a personal bond with theatres that little have done before. ... Continue Reading

Film Review: Ghost Stories (UK, 2018) is a refreshing and original horror anthology

With high replay value and some clever pacing, Andy Nyman and Jeremy Dyson have transposed their West End play Ghost Stories to the big screen with a refreshing eye for originality, spinning a grand three-part horror anthology into one thoroughly entertaining and unpredictable film that never stops subtly building towards its tremendous finale. And that’s ultimately where the genius in what Nyman and Dyson’s project lies, building an engaging central narrative that wraps around these individually fascinating and genuinely terrifying ghost stories; it works both as a horror anthology – a rarity these days, but with homage to classics like Dead of Night and Tales from the Crypt – and as a cohesive film.... Continue Reading

SXSW Film Review: Wobble Palace (USA, 2018) is alt-lit in cinema

You anticipate a film to be vogue when millennial buzzwords and Internet culture forms the first ten minutes. You probably wouldn’t expect that film to be any good either. I didn’t. But by the time Wobble Palace had reached its epilogue, it had convinced me of a couple of things. The first, that it wasn’t the film it seemed doomed to be.... Continue Reading

Interview: Lester Francois on using interactive VR to explore the work of Australia’s best-known street artist, Rone

Melbourne-based Director Lester Francois and a team of highly creative individuals are putting together an interactive VR docuseries that’ll highlight individuals artists in some very interesting ways. The planned series, titled Kinetic, begins with Rone, the first episode which recently premiered at SXSW in Austin, Texas and showcased an incredibly immersive, interactive VR experience examining the work and context of the famous Melbourne street artist of the same name.... Continue Reading

SXSW Interview: Timur Bekmambetov and Shazad Latif on new techno-thriller Profile

During our time at SXSW Film Festival this year, we got to sit with director Timur Bekmambetov and actor Shazad Latif to chat about their new film, Profile. Adapted from Anna Erelle‘s In the Skin of a Jihadist, the film looks at the complex online relationship that develops between an “undercover” reporter and a jihadist, shot entirely through the reporters computer (and social media accounts, e-mail and Skype).... Continue Reading

First Impressions: Netflix’s Rapture examines the power of hip hop with empathy and intimacy

Hip hop, now considered the dominant and most popular style of contemporary music in the world, is one of the most powerful and important forms of art to emerge in the past few decades, and that can be an incredibly hard notion for many to wrap their head around. The fascination with the art and culture has never been more prevalent, and we’re seeing that come across frequently with films (like Straight Outta Compton), TV series (like The Get Down) and documentaries (like The Defiant Ones) all of which can be related to one another due to a strong and powerful focus on context. These three works sketch in the reasons behind the rhymes, tethering hip hop’s music to the wider contexts in which these artists come from in order to make more people understand what is sometimes a very esoteric art form, one that requires a much deeper understanding of the culture to fully appreciate.... Continue Reading

Interview: Jeremy Workman and Matt Green on the making and meaning of The World Before Your Feet

There are very few documentaries out there that can offer the very of-the-now perspective The World Before Your Feet can. The latest film from Jeremy Workman focuses on subject Matt Green and his endlessly interesting, definitely obsessive, and slightly odd “project”. Anyone who follows his blog would already know; Green has taken it upon himself to walk every street in New York City. He has been walking for over 2,000 days now, and somehow Workman has managed to capture just a fraction (though conceptually a huge piece) of this journey over the past few years.... Continue Reading