Tag Archives: Three and a Half Stars

Film Review: Justice League (USA, 2017) is a fun yet inconsistent ride that breezes by on the charm of its cast

It’s been something of an arduous trek but the Justice League have finally made their way to the big screen.  Long before Joss Whedon earned the tick of approval from comic enthusiasts the world over with his take on The Avengers, George Miller (Mad Max, Happy Feet) was planning on brining the titular crew to cineplexes in an ambitious actioner where the likes of Armie Hammer and Megan Gale were to play Batman and Wonder Woman, respectively.  The 2007-2008 Writers Strike and multiple delays regarding shooting locations ultimately led to the film’s demise, and DC threw their weight behind the remainder of Christopher Nolan‘s Dark Knight trilogy, leaving the proposed Justice League little more than a pipe dream.... Continue Reading

AMW Film Fest Review: Take Me To The River (USA, 2015) is a soaring celebration of blues, rap and soul music

If American music has a heart and soul then you would find it nestled between Memphis and the Mississippi Delta. The documentary film, Take Me To The River realises this and pays homage to the soul men and women that created those passionate and influential hits for the likes of Stax Records and their ilk. This film is an absolute joy that shows the passing of the baton between some legendary and contemporary artists who work together to make beautiful music.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Bad Moms 2 (USA, 2017) is not for the taint-hearted

Ahh yes, the cinematic comedy sequel. These past several years, we have gotten many comedic sequels, whether they were made by popular demand, the means of nostalgia or the fact that Hollywood is running out of ideas.... Continue Reading

Byron Bay Film Festival Film Review: An American In Texas (USA, 2017) is a film for the disenfranchised

It’s a hard fought ninety-seven minutes for the protagonists in An American in Texas, but it’s a fight they could never really win. In Anthony Pedone’s latest, it’s the early 90’s and the U.S has its sights set on a war in the Middle East. As the effects of the conflict settle across the States, we meet a group of friends looking for their way out of small town Texas.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Happy Death Day (USA, 2017) survives on the strength of its sense of humour

As varying subsets of the horror genre have forged ahead in 2017 as some of the year’s biggest successes (Split, Get Out and It remain three of the most fruitful ventures), it only makes sense that the slasher genre attempt the resurgence it so desperately deserves. It simply isn’t enough however to let a film coax by on familiarity, especially in the horror field where most audiences are too smart to let the simplicity of a masked killer with a penchant for stalking young females be readily accepted.... Continue Reading

Cunard British Film Festival Review: Breathe (UK, 2017) is a love letter from one Cavendish to another

Breathe is a love letter from producer, Jonathan Cavendish to his inspiring parents. The film is a bio-pic that chronicles the enduring love that this couple shared for each other as well as their refusal to give up in the face of a devastating disease. This story is an important one that is a testament to the power of human strength; but there are also some moments where you feel like things are being played a little safe.... Continue Reading

Greek Film Festival Review: Amerika Square (Greece, 2016) scales the political polarity in Greece to a single housing block

Until the day when Pixel Buds are so finessed that we no longer need those streaming lines of text, subtitles will be (for most of us) our one entry to foreign films. It’s rare though for subtitles to impact the film in any other way, but in Yannis Sakaridis’s Amerika Square, those flashing words do far more than translate.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Battle of the Sexes (USA, 2017) is topical, crowd-pleasing entertainment

Despite its 1973 setting, Battle of the Sexes is very much a film for the now with Billie Jean King’s story appearing just as relevant today as it did back then.  Stances on sexuality and the pay parity between genders as depicted here is likely to strike a chord with many an audience member, but as topical as Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris‘s film intends to be, it’s crowd-pleasing entertainment at the end of the day.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Captain Underpants: The First Epic Movie (USA, 2017) is a family treat for the senses

DreamWorks Animation is back with a new film, and what can we say about this little animation company, soon to celebrate a successful 20-year run? They’ve come an exceedingly long way since their first animated feature, Antz, in 1998, a film that felt so forced to catch up with Pixar (who released A Bug’s Life around the same time amid a feud between the two companies) many wrote them off before they’d barely begun. The Prince of Egypt didn’t do them any favours at the time either, though both were commercial successes (not the same could be said for The Road to El Dorado, however). It wasn’t until their first stop-motion animation, 2000’s Chicken Run, where the tide seemed to turn.... Continue Reading