Tag Archives: Three and a Half Stars

Film Review: Things To Come (France/Germany, 2016) is a quiet meditation on middle-age turmoil

Just like starting over. That’s the name of a John Lennon song but it’s also a line that could be used to sum up the French film, Things To Come (L’avenir). The story is a subtle character study about a middle-aged woman and how she negotiates a bunch of set-backs with a kind of understated and inspired dignity.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Free Fire (UK, 2016) avoids Hollywood action tropes in the best way

The films by British director Ben Wheatley have all been incredibly distinct from another and are all very well-done. Whether going through the genre of crime, psychological horror, dark comedy, dystopian drama or historical surrealism, you can never accuse Wheatley of doing the same trick twice. But the crucial through-line through all his films is a streak of black humour.... Continue Reading

Film Review: HBO’s The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is a vital bio-pic about the most important woman in medical history

The name Henrietta Lacks may not mean an awful lot to some people but in reality it should be one of the most famous names in history. Lacks is responsible for revolutionising modern medicine and contributing to every recent major medical breakthrough from vaccines for polio, HPV and the flu-shot; to IVF and treatments for cancer and AIDs. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is an excellent bio-pic that gives some long-overdue credit to where it is due.... Continue Reading

TV Review: Outcast Season 2 Episode 2 “The Day After That” adds more questions

Episode two of the FX series Outcast‘s second season hits the ground running with a crash outside of town being discovered by a local police officer. It seems that rather than following the original fabricated alibi Giles had created (Mark taking his own life), due to Maggie’s wishes of her husband not seen giving up on his family, Giles has set it up so it looks as if Mark was killed in a car crash instead.... Continue Reading

Film Review: The Fate of the Furious (USA, 2017) is completely aware of how ridiculous it is

An impressively persistent beast of sorts, the Fast & Furious franchise has become one of the most lucrative commodities of today’s industry, despite an initial series of less-than sequels that threatened to burn the title out before it had a chance to properly compete.... Continue Reading

Film Review: A Silent Voice (Japan, 2017) is an authentic and delicate coming-of-age story

Naoko Yamada’s A Silent Voice is an authentic and delicate coming-of-age story exploring a tale of romance and redemption. The animation is based on the manga series of the same name from 2013-2014 by Yoshitoki Ōima. A Silent Voice provides a fruitful outlook on the future of Japanese anime, and its success in western markets, particularly with the end of the legendary Studio Ghibli (See My Neighbor Totoro, Princess Monoke, Spirited Way) nearing.... Continue Reading

AF French Film Festival Review: Tran Anh Hung’s Eternity (France, 2016) is a tone poem brought to life

Though I am Vietnamese, because I was raised in Australia for all of my life, I never really experienced much of Vietnamese culture. However, there were some films that I had watched that had always stuck with me, and those were the works of Vietnamese director Tran Anh Hung.... Continue Reading

TV Review: The Walking Dead Season 7 Episode 14 “The Other Side” hits the right emotional beats

As we near an obvious showdown between Negan and team Rick we continue season 7’s clumsy attempt to atone for a defining sluggish pace and what has been the series’ most inconsistent show of quality since the first half of season 2. Thankfully, like last week’s enjoyable “Bury Me Here”, the show continues in the right direction with “The Other Side”.... Continue Reading

SXSW Film Review: California Dreams (USA, 2017) should be called “California Delusions”

With La La Land having recently dominated the Oscars, its story about 2 hopefuls trying to make it in Hollywood uncomfortably lingered in the back of my mind while watching California Dreams. Both La La Land and California Dreams share a similar premise of “dreams are built on sacrifice”, however the films attack their subject matter of struggling actors in entirely different ways. While La La Land shimmers with the temptation of nostalgia, love and the greediness of having your cake and eating it too, California Dreams explores sacrifice when you can’t even afford the ingredients to make that proverbial cake.... Continue Reading