Tag Archives: Three Stars

TV Review: The Walking Dead Season 8 Episode 4 “Some Guy”

Building King Ezekiel’s regal facade has been given little screen time on The Walking Dead. The “king” with a knack for role-playing to build a sense of escapism and confidence for his “Kingdom” only took on a pivotal role deep into last season, and with the way the show is structured the writers have had to speed through his otherwise intriguing approach to the undead apocalypse with piles of thin, expository dialogue. Spending an entire episode stripping all of that away would have been much more effective had their been more than two or so scenes getting to explore why he does what he does. Although, “Some Guy” does a decent job at taking the King’s righteous fantasy and letting the reality of a caustic combo of walkers and Saviours completely eat away at it all.... Continue Reading

TV Review: The Walking Dead Season 8 Episode 3 “Monsters”

“Monsters” is very much a direct continuation from last week’s “The Damned”, and on the surface that is very wise choice for The Walking Dead, treating these as installments in a wider thread rather than thematically distinctive “episodes”. This week, we were dropped right back into the all-out assault against The Saviours, coming from Team Alexandria (et al) as Rick’s meticulous plan slots further into place, aggressively attacking outposts to cut off Negan’s defensive and offensive power. It was also a chance for the show to re-arrange what seems to be the major character arcs moving into this season, and while it’s still all very uneven in certain places at least we have optimism both in tone and a clear vision of where this show is going after a choppy seventh season; with “mercy” bring the motif, attempting to remind us that those who follow Negan are people too.... Continue Reading

AMW Film Festival Review: Breaking The Mould (Australia, 2017) is a compelling documentary about Australia’s female musicians

If there was Australia’s answer to the film, Play Your Gender, then Breaking The Mould is it. This music documentary includes interviews with Australian artists about their thoughts and experiences with gender in the local industry. The film is an interesting one about our history and it is something that should help shape the conversation around what should happen next.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Three Summers (Australia, 2017) is an amiable comedy about diversity

Three Summers is a film that is as light and breezy as its title suggests. It’s also an ensemble comedy that is written and directed by the legendary, Ben Elton. The latter is known for his novels and the TV shows: The Young Ones and Blackadder. In Three Summers he creates a warm-hearted and well-intentioned story about Australian race relations. The message is that we should all embrace diversity and listen to each other’s stories. While it’s excellent to see a film about Australia actually reflect the people from this wonderful land of Oz, it’s a damn pity that the plot is so lacking.... Continue Reading

TV Review: The Walking Dead Season 8, Episode 1 “Mercy”

The Walking Dead hasn’t lost sight of its impressive history nor it’s central cast, and “Mercy”, the landmark 100th episode of the juggernaut survival-horror drama, is a well-rounded declaration of that. The start to what will hopefully be a return to form following a haphazard seventh season, it’s an episode imbued with the kind of optimism and leadership (both literal and figurative) that threw last year’s string of episodes into turmoil and forced the show to bend around Negan’s cartoon-supervillain shtick. From previous errors it’s clear that just because one things works well in the comics, doesn’t mean it’ll work on the small screen; it seems the writers are beginning to realise that.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Brigsby Bear (USA, 2017) is a peculiar yet heartfelt viewing experience

When you hear a film that is green-lit and it is basically a vehicle for an SNL star, chances are that one would expect the film to be bad. Films like A Night at the Roxbury, Superstar and The Ladies Man are all garbage. That said, some of them do gain a cult following over time like Hot Rod and MacGruber, and there are also some that are genuinely funny, like the Wayne’s World films, Mean Girls and others.... Continue Reading

Greek Film Festival Review: Afterlov (Greece, 2016) is a quirky film that dissects the concept of a break-up

If a relationship break-up has ever left you questioning, “Why?” or “What’s next?” then Afterlov is the film for you. This Greek dramedy sees its main protagonist grappling with these questions to the point of obsession. So what is this leading man to do but confront these things as well as his ex. The only problem is that he won’t settle until he gets the answers he wants and the result is a veritable cornucopia of different emotions.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Kingsman: The Golden Circle (UK, 2017) is an enjoyable ride but does it overstay its welcome?

When Kingsman: The Secret Service debuted in 2015, it became a critical darling and surprise commercial hit due to strong word of mouth, and a truly original and exciting approach to the spy (and in many respects, the superhero / comic book) genre. Funny, irreverent and wholly memorable, it stands apart as one of the most entertaining films of the last few years. It’s unsurprising then that the surviving members of the cast – of which there were admittedly few – as well as director Matthew Vaughn (who was previously best known for another brilliant adaptation, Kick-Ass) have quickly reunited for a sequel, The Golden Circle, which hits cinemas today.... Continue Reading

OzAsia Film Review: Villainess (South Korea, 2017) brings video game violence to the big screen

Villainess doesn’t waste any time, giving the audience exactly what they came for; a full on, bloody action movie. And boy does it deliver exactly what it promises. The whole premise – a story about an assassin out for revenge – comes with big expectations of huge action sequences and lots of knives, and with a 10 minute opening scene dedicated to our assassin, Sook-hee (played by Ok-bin Kim), violently cutting through a building full of men while she’s on a warpath to find the person she holds responsible for the death of her father, there isn’t any doubt Villainess plans to deliver on every bit of violence that earned it an R18+ rating.... Continue Reading