Tag Archives: Three Stars

Film Review: Kingsman: The Golden Circle (UK, 2017) is an enjoyable ride but does it overstay its welcome?

When Kingsman: The Secret Service debuted in 2015, it became a critical darling and surprise commercial hit due to strong word of mouth, and a truly original and exciting approach to the spy (and in many respects, the superhero / comic book) genre. Funny, irreverent and wholly memorable, it stands apart as one of the most entertaining films of the last few years. It’s unsurprising then that the surviving members of the cast – of which there were admittedly few – as well as director Matthew Vaughn (who was previously best known for another brilliant adaptation, Kick-Ass) have quickly reunited for a sequel, The Golden Circle, which hits cinemas today.... Continue Reading

OzAsia Film Review: Villainess (South Korea, 2017) brings video game violence to the big screen

Villainess doesn’t waste any time, giving the audience exactly what they came for; a full on, bloody action movie. And boy does it deliver exactly what it promises. The whole premise – a story about an assassin out for revenge – comes with big expectations of huge action sequences and lots of knives, and with a 10 minute opening scene dedicated to our assassin, Sook-hee (played by Ok-bin Kim), violently cutting through a building full of men while she’s on a warpath to find the person she holds responsible for the death of her father, there isn’t any doubt Villainess plans to deliver on every bit of violence that earned it an R18+ rating.... Continue Reading

Review: Marvel’s Inhumans may be game changing for IMAX, but is it a missed opportunity?

At the end of this month, Inhumans, the latest entry into the Marvel Cinematic Universe will kick off as a television series on ABC TV in the US – the home of the successful Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. series, which will enter its fifth season later this year. Today, Inhumans – the third ABC studios series to form part of the MCU, and first since Agent Carter was cancelled last year – made history by becoming the first ever live action series to be filmed entirely with IMAX cameras; the first two episodes debuting on IMAX screens around the world as a 75 minute big screen adventure.... Continue Reading

Film Review: The Hitman’s Bodyguard (USA, 2017) is a funny, familiar buddy-cop ride

Sometimes it’s not always necessary for a film to be unique or spectacular or innovative for it to be enjoyable. Sometimes all we need is for it to be fun and ridiculous and easily digestible for it to provide that escapism. The Hitman’s Bodyguard brings together two particular Hollywood actors who have their own distinct “brand” to lead an action-comedy-buddy-cop-type of film that doesn’t intend to set the world on fire but prefers to just kick back and enjoy itself in an almost meta way.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Maudie (Canada, 2016) is a colourful portrait which proves that love & talent can be found in unlikely places

If Forrest Gump where a female, Canadian folk artist you would get Maudie. This film is a biopic about the late artist, Maud Lewis who was born a “little different” and whose story is one that is likely to charm some theatregoers. This movie is ultimately a rather romanticised view of her creative and impoverished life.... Continue Reading

Film Review: The Dark Tower (USA, 2017) is tolerable for casual viewers but disappointing for die-hard King fans

Full disclosure, I have not read any of the Stephen King The Dark Tower series of books. As somebody who is unaware of the source material, I was going into the film adaptation of The Dark Tower with the simple expectation of wanting to enjoy a film, to be transported to another place, be invested in the characters and to be able to follow the story without being confused by any context I might be missing.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Valerian And The City Of A Thousand Planets (FRA/USA, 2017) is pure visual escapism but hampered by unconvincing casting

When visionary filmmaker Luc Besson first picked up a copy of the French graphic novel series Valerian and Laureline by Pierre Christin and Jean-Claude Mezieres he was inspired to bring that story to cinema screens and has been working towards that goal for most of his life. Coincidentally Mezieres was hired by Besson to assist him on the design of 1997’s The Fifth Element hailed as one of Besson’s greatest sci-fi film epics. And it’s somehow poignant that the year that film celebrates its 20th anniversary is the same year he releases another space opera which is even bolder, brassier, more colourful and expansive than its predecessor. However Valerian And The City Of A Thousand Planets might be more visually grandiose but it does have a few flaws that prevent it from surpassing its forebear.... Continue Reading