Tag Archives: Three Stars

Review: Marvel’s Inhumans may be game changing for IMAX, but is it a missed opportunity?

At the end of this month, Inhumans, the latest entry into the Marvel Cinematic Universe will kick off as a television series on ABC TV in the US – the home of the successful Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. series, which will enter its fifth season later this year. Today, Inhumans – the third ABC studios series to form part of the MCU, and first since Agent Carter was cancelled last year – made history by becoming the first ever live action series to be filmed entirely with IMAX cameras; the first two episodes debuting on IMAX screens around the world as a 75 minute big screen adventure.... Continue Reading

Film Review: The Hitman’s Bodyguard (USA, 2017) is a funny, familiar buddy-cop ride

Sometimes it’s not always necessary for a film to be unique or spectacular or innovative for it to be enjoyable. Sometimes all we need is for it to be fun and ridiculous and easily digestible for it to provide that escapism. The Hitman’s Bodyguard brings together two particular Hollywood actors who have their own distinct “brand” to lead an action-comedy-buddy-cop-type of film that doesn’t intend to set the world on fire but prefers to just kick back and enjoy itself in an almost meta way.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Maudie (Canada, 2016) is a colourful portrait which proves that love & talent can be found in unlikely places

If Forrest Gump where a female, Canadian folk artist you would get Maudie. This film is a biopic about the late artist, Maud Lewis who was born a “little different” and whose story is one that is likely to charm some theatregoers. This movie is ultimately a rather romanticised view of her creative and impoverished life.... Continue Reading

Film Review: The Dark Tower (USA, 2017) is tolerable for casual viewers but disappointing for die-hard King fans

Full disclosure, I have not read any of the Stephen King The Dark Tower series of books. As somebody who is unaware of the source material, I was going into the film adaptation of The Dark Tower with the simple expectation of wanting to enjoy a film, to be transported to another place, be invested in the characters and to be able to follow the story without being confused by any context I might be missing.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Valerian And The City Of A Thousand Planets (FRA/USA, 2017) is pure visual escapism but hampered by unconvincing casting

When visionary filmmaker Luc Besson first picked up a copy of the French graphic novel series Valerian and Laureline by Pierre Christin and Jean-Claude Mezieres he was inspired to bring that story to cinema screens and has been working towards that goal for most of his life. Coincidentally Mezieres was hired by Besson to assist him on the design of 1997’s The Fifth Element hailed as one of Besson’s greatest sci-fi film epics. And it’s somehow poignant that the year that film celebrates its 20th anniversary is the same year he releases another space opera which is even bolder, brassier, more colourful and expansive than its predecessor. However Valerian And The City Of A Thousand Planets might be more visually grandiose but it does have a few flaws that prevent it from surpassing its forebear.... Continue Reading

Film Review: The Time Of Their Lives (UK, 2017) is a pleasant road trip & light comedy about two unlikely friends

The Time Of Their Lives is a film about two unlikely friends getting a second chance at life. It’s one where you feel like if it had had its own second chance it could have been excellent, but instead will have to settle for being just good. This is ultimately a light, comedy caper and buddy story about two old biddies letting their hair down on the road.... Continue Reading

TV Review: Fear the Walking Dead Season 3 Episode 5 “Burning in Water…” introduces a new conflict

Coming off one of their strongest episodes, the self-contained “100” with the focus solely on a returning Daniel (Rubén Blades), Fear the Walking Dead pull us back into life at the supposedly safe Broke Jaw Ranch where Madison is holed up with Nick and Alicia, trying to prove their value to the suspicious community. “Burning in Water, Drowning in Flame” brings the ranch’s curious history to the forefront straight from it’s awkwardly quick cold-opener in which one of several founders – the first we, as the audience, hear of Otto having partners who helped start the ranch – awakes to find his wife has turned, making the immediate decision to end both their lives which spills over into their house-on-the-hill burning down.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: Phantom Boy (France, 2015) is oddly engaging and effortlessly weird

Whilst animation in film has evolved immensely over the last 20 years, there’s something immediately charming about Phantom Boy‘s deliberately flat and simple palleted aesthetic.  It may lack the emotional weight of the technically more refined Pixar offerings, but this film’s distinct look feels organically melded to its somber mentality.... Continue Reading