Tag Archives: Two and a Half Stars

Film Review: Ideal Home (USA, 2018) is an average comedy with some chuckles, thanks to the leads

Considering the political climate that were in, you figure a mainstream comedy like Ideal Home, a film about two gay fathers that borders on stereotypes would be a bad idea. At least, that’s what people have been saying out there, due to impressions from the trailers and the posters.... Continue Reading

Sydney Film Festival Review: The Seagull (USA, 2018) is a charming bore

Despite scene-swallowing work from Annette Bening (fabulous, as to be expected), the quiet mastery of Saoirse Ronan, and a brilliantly comical Elisabeth Moss, Michael Mayer‘s The Seagull (adapted from Anton Chekhov‘s classic play) fails to deliver them material worthy of their considerable talent.... Continue Reading

Film Review: A Wrinkle in Time (USA, 2018) aims valiantly for the stars, but falls flat on its face

Fantasy films aimed towards children can be a very tricky proposition. Usually, films of this type aim to entertain the entire family but for ones that specifically aim for children, how does one critique a film like this? Judge the film for what it is? Or judge the film through the eyes of a child?... Continue Reading

Film Review: Pacific Rim: Uprising (USA, 2018) is a glorified B-movie that’s entertaining in all its wild stupidity

Given his penchant for dark, more gothic views on material, Guillermo del Toro‘s foray into big budget filmmaking – 2013’s Pacific Rim – always seemed a little odd.  Capable of delivering so much more than what that film ultimately was able to, del Toro may have injected some of his usual fantastic-ness into proceedings, but a procession of sequences featuring giant robots fighting mythical creatures interspersed with questionable acting resulted in a destructively silly actioner that was more trash than treasure.... Continue Reading

Alliance Française French Film Festival Review: Rock’n Roll (France, 2017) is an uneven mockumentary dripping in silliness & excess

Rock’ n Roll is a film that doesn’t take itself too seriously. The same can also be said about the film’s star, writer and director, Guillaume Canet. The result is an uneven French comedy and a satire that examines the worst of Hollywood and show business ego, and while it deserves points for originality, the script requires some serious tightening and finessing (I imagine there’s a joke in there about wrinkles but we’ll let that one slide.)... Continue Reading

Film Review: Den of Thieves (USA, 2018) is a competent homage to Michael Mann’s epic heist saga Heat

Heist films are a dime-a-dozen these days. They’re the ones that fit the “put people on a mission” genre, starring a well known ensemble cast, who have been given an exciting plot where cast chemistry, filmmaking chops and fun storytelling mix together to make an entertaining night out for cinemagoers.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Borg vs McEnroe (Sweden, 2017) is an uneven film that never feels complete

Borg vs McEnroe feels like a film more tailored for the streaming services market.  A minor feature that’s likely to only really be of interest to tennis fanatics, and even then they might prefer a more traditional documentary, Janus Metz Pedersen‘s drama never feels like a complete production, despite its substantial focus on Bjorn Borg (Sverrir Gudnason) and his intensely monitored childhood.... Continue Reading

Film Review: Jigsaw (USA, 2017) attempts to piece together the Saw franchise

Was rebooting the seven-film-deep Saw franchise seven years after the abysmal Saw 3D really necessary? No, not really. The gore-porn films have always been enormously successful despite a substantial drop in quality from the first two entries, so financially there’s little to lose, but the story of the “Jigsaw Killer” really has nothing left to say. This leaves Jigsaw in a rather precarious position, assuming Lionsgate Films wanted this eighth entry to be seen as anything but a sure-fire way to make a profit. From the title it would be reasonable to assume that this an origin story of sorts, falling in-line with the now long-standing trend that has spilled over from artsy superhero films although that’s not necessarily the case here, particularly since there’s plenty of “origin” about Jigsaw already established; instead, the film is much of the same from previous entries, but benefits by scrapping the convoluted thread that spun the original series out of control, bringing the focus back to the curious philosophical underpinnings of Jigsaw’s malicious design.... Continue Reading

Greek Film Festival Review: Mythopathy (Notias) (Greece, 2016) is a coming-of-age story that should appeal to Greek audiences

Mythopathy (Notias) is a film about a boy. Except he’s not just any old kid. This child is one that experiences heartbreak in a novel way. When it happens, he looks towards ancient Greek mythology and stories and he changes aspects of these to suit his own narrative. This coming-of-age story is emotional and imaginative at times but it’s also a little forgettable and difficult to understand at others.... Continue Reading

Cunard British Film Festival Review: That Good Night (UK, 2017) is a dull adaption of a stage play that grapples with morality

That Good Night is a film that could be been called “The Last Night.” This is because it’s a drama about second chances and forgiveness. This handsome film is the last one that the late Sir John Hurt acted in and while it has some intriguing moments, it ultimately suffers from being a play that has been stretched out in order to be adapted for the big screen.... Continue Reading